learn about (someone or something)

(redirected from learned about)

learn about (someone or something)

1. To become knowledgeable or informed about someone or something. We learned about the rotation of the planets in science class today. The point of the game is for kids to learn about important historical figures in a fun, exciting way.
2. To discover or uncover some particular information about someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "learn" and "about. I learned something interesting about the way gravity works today. See if you can learn any dirty secrets about our opponent.
See also: learn
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

learn about someone or something

to find out about someone or something. What have you learned about Mr. Franklin and his business dealings? I learned about what causes rain.
See also: learn
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, these same construction students also learned about another country, deep in the throws of a civil war, and the impact of such an experience on its citizens and the personal experience of a refugee from that country.
While the ILSSL have received extensive attention since their appearance in the summer of 1998, much of the attention--understandably--has been devoted to practice as the field learned about and tried to implement the new national guidelines.
For example, while University pre-service teachers served as tutors, they learned about service-learning as a teaching pedagogy and philosophy, implemented service learning projects with the middle school students, and learned how to individualize instruction to reach all students and address their needs.
They learned about resources and other factors, both living and nonliving, that promote and limit growth of populations in an ecosystem.
I learned about the history that these people experienced before I was even born!" Remarked Alex, "I doubted the importance of students' role in community building.
Greater responsibility and greater interest resulted in a third virtue of summary/reaction journals: We learned about our own beliefs and ourselves.
We learned about the "whys" of our own professional activities.
I have also learned about my personal learning strengths and weaknesses."
The coders created categories that represented the paraphrases and synonyms as well as the diversity of reported actions so that all actions were categorized (e.g, "I learned about lack of state funding for schools.
I liked being able to encourage the children."), Negative affect ("I felt sad and depressed for the clients' families."), Mixed affect ("Felt uncomfortable yet excited about working with students"), Neutral affect--No emotion is inferred or expressed by the student ("I learned about human interaction.")
A required paper includes the students' description of what they learned about themselves as they interacted in a multicultural environment.
Further, the lessons learned about using these approaches to assessing distance teaching and learning are highlighted.