leapt


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leap at the chance (to do something)

To accept or seize with alacrity an opportunity (to do something). Mark complains about his teaching job a lot, but I knew if he were offered a tenured position in the school, he would leap at the chance. When our manager said she was leaving the company, I leaped at the chance to fill the job.
See also: chance, leap

leap on the bandwagon

To join or follow something once it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just leap on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she just leaped on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, leap, on

leap at (someone or something)

1. To jump toward someone or something. I shrieked when the dog suddenly leaped at me.
2. To accept or seize with alacrity an opportunity. Often used in the phrase "leap at the chance (to do something)." Mark complains about his teaching job a lot, but I knew if he were offered a tenured position in the school, he would leap at it. When our manager said she was leaving the company, I leaped at the chance to fill the job.
See also: leap

leap to the eye

To become immediately apparent upon viewing or reading. One thing that leaps to the eye when looking at his newest painting is the almost thematic use of contrasting light and dark color schemes. I've read the report, but nothing leapt to my eye to suggest any impropriety.
See also: eye, leap

(one's) heart leaps

One feels a flutter in one's chest or stomach from happiness or excitement. I swear, my heart leaped the first time I saw my wife. My heart leaps every time I think of moving to Ireland next month.
See also: heart, leap

leap in

1. To jump into something or some place. I leapt in the air to try and catch the ball. Before you leap in the driver's seat and start cruising the streets, make sure you do your normal safety check that you learned during your driving lessons.
2. To suddenly join an in-progress activity. They were already halfway through the development cycle with the project when I joined the company, so I just had to leap in and learn on the fly. Leap in anytime you feel like playing!
See also: leap

leap out

1. To jump out of or outward from something or some place. I leapt out of bed when I heard the alarm going off. I was shocked to see a frog leap out when I opened the mailbox.
2. To stand out in stark contrast to something or to the surroundings. The brilliant use of complementary colors makes the characters leap out at the viewer. Once I understood the basics of the equation, the answer leapt out at me.
See also: leap, out

leap out (of something)

to jump outward from something. A mouse leapt out of the cereal box and frightened everyone. I opened the box and a mouse leapt out.
See also: leap, out

leap to the eye

(especially of writing) be immediately apparent.
See also: eye, leap

leap in

v.
1. To spring or bound in or into something: I couldn't resist leaping in the big pile of raked leaves on the ground. The couch looked so comfortable that we just leapt in.
2. To join some activity that is already in progress: I leapt in the game they had been playing. Whenever you feel like joining us, just leap in!
See also: leap

leap out

v.
1. To spring or bound outward: The cat leaped out from behind the bush and pounced on the mouse.
2. To draw immediate attention; be immediately apparent: That red lettering really leaps out from the page. If the answers don't leap out at you, you probably didn't study enough.
See also: leap, out