leapt


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leap at the chance (to do something)

To accept or seize with alacrity an opportunity (to do something). Mark complains about his teaching job a lot, but I knew if he were offered a tenured position in the school, he would leap at the chance. When our manager said she was leaving the company, I leaped at the chance to fill the job.
See also: chance, leap

leap on the bandwagon

To join or follow something once it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just leap on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she just leaped on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, leap, on

leap at (someone or something)

1. To jump toward someone or something. I shrieked when the dog suddenly leaped at me.
2. To accept or seize with alacrity an opportunity. Often used in the phrase "leap at the chance (to do something)." Mark complains about his teaching job a lot, but I knew if he were offered a tenured position in the school, he would leap at it. When our manager said she was leaving the company, I leaped at the chance to fill the job.
See also: leap

leap to the eye

To become immediately apparent upon viewing or reading. One thing that leaps to the eye when looking at his newest painting is the use of contrasting light and dark color schemes. I've read the report, but nothing leapt to the eye to suggest any impropriety.
See also: eye, leap

(one's) heart leaps

One feels a flutter in one's chest or stomach from happiness or excitement. I swear, my heart leaped the first time I saw my wife. My heart leaps every time I think of moving to Ireland next month.
See also: heart, leap

leap in

1. To jump into something or some place. I leapt in the air to try and catch the ball. Before you leap in the driver's seat and start cruising the streets, make sure you do your normal safety check that you learned during your driving lessons.
2. To suddenly join an in-progress activity. They were already halfway through the development cycle with the project when I joined the company, so I just had to leap in and learn on the fly. Leap in anytime you feel like playing!
See also: leap

leap out

1. To jump out of or outward from something or some place. I leapt out of bed when I heard the alarm going off. I was shocked to see a frog leap out when I opened the mailbox.
2. To stand out in stark contrast to something or to the surroundings. The brilliant use of complementary colors makes the characters leap out at the viewer. Once I understood the basics of the equation, the answer leapt out at me.
See also: leap, out

leap at the opportunity (to do something)

To accept or seize with alacrity an opportunity (to do something). Mark complains about his teaching job a lot, but I knew if he were offered a tenured position in the school, he would leap at the opportunity. When our manager said she was leaving the company, I leaped at the opportunity to get her job. You should have been leaping at the opportunity to move someplace new and exciting—instead, you decided to just stay in the same town you've always known.
See also: leap, opportunity

leap down

To jump or hop down to a lower level or place, especially very quickly or suddenly. I leapt down after my mother shouted at me not to climb on the wall. The cat leaped down off the table when I came by with the feather duster. I wish you wouldn't leap down from the top bunk like that—it sounds like you're going to crash straight through the floor!
See also: down, leap

leap for joy

To be exuberant or very happy about something. I practically leapt for joy when I saw that I'd gotten an A on that impossible history test. I'm going to leap for joy when I see my boyfriend at the airport.
See also: joy, leap

leap forward

To hop, jump, or dart forward very quickly or suddenly. I crouched down to pet the dog, when all of a sudden it leapt forward and bit me. Janet leaped forward when the singer asked if anyone wanted an autograph.
See also: forward, leap

leap up

To hop, jump, or stand up very quickly or suddenly. The child was leaping up trying to get her kite down from the tree. He leapt up from his chair in alarm when he heard the back door open. The cat leaped up and snatched the bird out of the air.
See also: leap, up

leap to (one's) defense

To begin defending one very quickly or abruptly. I appreciate the thought, but I don't need you leaping to my defense every time someone starts arguing with me. Thankfully, a group of people in the bar leaped to her defense when the man started assaulting her. The boss singled out Jonathan when he started criticizing the progress of the project, so I leaped to his defense.
See also: defense, leap

leap to (one's) feet

To quickly or abruptly assume a standing position. The kids leaped to their feet the moment I walked in the room, so I knew they were up to something bad. We all leapt to our feet to applaud the amazing performance.
See also: feet, leap

leap down (from something)

to hop down from something or some place. The performer leapt down from the stage and ran up the aisle. She leapt down and ran away.
See also: down, leap

leap for joy

 and jump for joy
Fig. to jump up because one is happy; to be very happy. Tommy leapt for joy because he had won the race. We all leapt for joy when we heard the news.
See also: joy, leap

leap forward

to jump or hop forward. The little creature leapt forward and looked carefully at us. As the frog leapt forward, the kitten jumped straight up and fled.
See also: forward, leap

leap out (of something)

to jump outward from something. A mouse leapt out of the cereal box and frightened everyone. I opened the box and a mouse leapt out.
See also: leap, out

leap up

to jump upwards. The dog leapt up and licked my cheek. I leapt up so I could see over the wall for just a second.
See also: leap, up

leap to the eye

(especially of writing) be immediately apparent.
See also: eye, leap

leap in

v.
1. To spring or bound in or into something: I couldn't resist leaping in the big pile of raked leaves on the ground. The couch looked so comfortable that we just leapt in.
2. To join some activity that is already in progress: I leapt in the game they had been playing. Whenever you feel like joining us, just leap in!
See also: leap

leap out

v.
1. To spring or bound outward: The cat leaped out from behind the bush and pounced on the mouse.
2. To draw immediate attention; be immediately apparent: That red lettering really leaps out from the page. If the answers don't leap out at you, you probably didn't study enough.
See also: leap, out