leap of faith

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leap of faith

1. An acceptance of or willingness to do something based largely or entirely on one's faith that it is correct or will work, despite having little or no evidence or assurance thereof. It will be quite the leap of faith for us to trust an outsider to run the organization, after the family has maintained control for over 100 years. I feel a bit wary that people seem so eager to make a leap of faith about driverless cars being free to drive in our streets.
2. In video games, a jump that the player's character is forced to make when the player is unable to see where they will land. Because the game doesn't offer any control over the camera, there are a number of occasions where you have to take a leap of faith and just hope for the best.
See also: faith, leap, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*leap of faith

Fig. acceptance of an idea or conclusion largely on faith. (*Typically: be ~; make ~; require ~.) We had to make quite a leap of faith to accept his promise after the last time he let us down.
See also: faith, leap, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

leap of faith

A belief or trust in something intangible or incapable of being proved. For example, It required a leap of faith to pursue this unusual step of transplanting an animals' heart into a human patient .
See also: faith, leap, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

leap of faith

The act or an instance of believing or trusting in something intangible or incapable of being proved.
See also: faith, leap, of
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

leap of faith

A belief or trust in something or someone that has no basis in past experience or fact. It is often applied to technological breakthroughs, as in “It took a real leap of faith for the first astronaut to step out on the Moon.” A Boston Globe article by Thomas Oliphant quotes Senator Edward Kennedy discussing a Supreme Court nominee: “The confirmation of nominees to our courts should not require a leap of faith. Nominees must earn their confirmation by providing us with full knowledge of the values and convictions they will bring to decisions. . . .” (Sept. 29, 2005).
See also: faith, leap, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
You will find that your greatest opportunities for growth and success will come from those leaps of faith you take.
Full of comic interludes, joyous cat behavior profiles, and humourous leaps of faith, "Does God Ever Speak Through Cats?" presents the idea that perhaps human faith development parallels the ability to trust and love a cat.
"Democracy should not ever require leaps of faith," writes journalist William Rivers Pitt in a Truthout report, "and we have put the fate of our nation into the hands of machines that require such a leap."
In Birmingham, fans made 20-foot leaps of faith between two buses and girls bared their breasts as wild scenes involving hundreds of sozzled supporters brought the city centre to a standstill.
Not so much a considered argument as a romp, "Workspheres" staged a frenetic, slightly disheveled revue of 20 0-plus brainstorms, shots from the hip, and leaps of faith by designers from around the globe, riffing on the work world to come.