leap to conclusions


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leap to conclusions

To make decisions or form opinions before one has all the pertinent facts. I know you found some suspicious things in her office, but don't leap to conclusions—talk to her first and see if she has a reasonable explanation. You're always leaping to conclusions whenever I make the slightest criticism of our relationship!
See also: conclusion, leap

jump/leap to conˈclusions

make a decision about somebody/something too quickly, before you know or have thought about all the facts: There you go again — jumping to conclusions. Wait till you hear my side of the story!
See also: conclusion, jump, leap
References in periodicals archive ?
We cannot leap to conclusions, for the ones that we are likely to draw--that the poor are not poor because they want to be, for example--easily dissolve in the actual telling.
It is tempting to leap to conclusions and link this to Al Qaida and Osama bin Laden's taped warning on Sunday but as yet the evidence is missing, while the Egyptian government places the blame on locals without international links.
Susan's embarrassing leap to conclusions about fellow party guests puts her future with Karl in doubt.
Asked about the timing of the skirmishes, he said he did not want to leap to conclusions "but we take such hypotheses into consideration".
I am not going to leap to conclusions not supported by more evidence so this goes down as simply something that happened.
The key is to establish the facts very clearly and not to leap to conclusions.
'This unique research shows how important it is to examine each infant death thoroughly and fairly and not leap to conclusions based on perceived notions.'
The guardian, meanwhile, will not have his authority questioned and brought up the case of Lubo Moravcik to underline the way supporters and others leap to conclusions.