lean in

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lean in

1. To bend or incline closer to the interior or central point of something, such as a structure, classroom, group of people, etc. I had to lean in to hear what the professor was saying. We all leaned in to look at the specimen in the tank. Water damage has caused the wall in our living room to start leaning in.
2. A phrase used to encourage professional women to pursue career advancement and leadership roles. It comes from the title of Sheryl Sandberg's 2013 book Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, about her career and role as a Facebook executive. In the spirit of leaning in, I'm going for that big promotion at work. Sure, the idea of leaning in and taking on more responsibility at the office is nice and all, but it's simply unfeasible for a single mother of three like myself.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lean in (to something)

to incline or press into something. You have to lean into the wind when you walk or you will be blown over. As you walk into the wind, lean in a little bit. The north wall of the barn leans in a little. Is it going to fall?
See also: lean
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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