leaning


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to leaning: leaning towards

lean over backwards

1. Literally, to bend backwards. I'm so sore after leaning over backwards and doing all those weird stretches at yoga this morning.
2. To exert a lot of effort toward some end. This phrase is often used to express frustration when one's efforts go unrecognized. I have been leaning over backwards to make sure that you have a wonderful visit, and you don't even care! The entire staff really needs to lean over backwards while the CEO is visiting our office.
See also: backward, lean, over

lean across (someone or something)

To stretch oneself across (someone or something), often while leaning on one's hand, elbow, etc. The student had to lean across several classmates to hand his assignment to the teacher. Will you please pass these papers down the aisle so I don't have to lean across? She leaned across the table to wipe the food from the child's face.
See also: across, lean

lean against

1. To rest or recline against someone or something; to be propped against someone or something else. There's a big piece of sheet metal leaning against the side of the barn that you can use. We took turns leaning against each other while we waited in line.
2. To cause someone or something to rest or recline against someone or something; to prop someone or something up against someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lean" and "against." We had to lean the injured soldier against the side of a tree while we scouted the surrounding area. You can just lean that mirror against the wall for the time being. Sorry, let me just lean this against you while I get the hooks drilled into the wall.
See also: lean

lean back

1. To bend or recline backwards. Here, lean back on the sofa and put this ice pack on your head. She leaned back and whispered something in her friend's ear.
2. To bend or recline someone or something backwards. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lean" and "back." The barber leaned me back to wash my hair in the basin. I leaned the large bookshelf back so Tom could vacuum underneath it.
See also: back, lean

lean back on (someone or something)

1. To rest or press on someone or something while bending or reclining backwards. Here, lean back on the sofa and put this ice pack on your head. I started leaning back on the man to push him out of the doorway.
2. To rest or prop someone or something on or against someone or something while bending or reclining backwards. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lean" and "back." They leaned the injured man back on me so I could lift him up across my shoulders. Just lean the mirror back on the sofa while we're painting the wall.
See also: back, lean, on

lean back against (someone or something)

1. To rest, press, or prop against someone or something while bending or reclining backwards. She leaned back against the tree and closed her eyes for a few minutes. I started leaning back against the man to push him out of the doorway.
2. To rest, press, or prop someone or something against someone or something while bending or reclining backwards. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lean" and "back." I leaned the injured man back against the wall so he could tell me what happened. Just lean the mirror back against the sofa while we're painting the wall.
See also: back, lean

lean down

1. To bend lower or toward the ground. Someone pushed me while I was leaning down to pick up a piece of paper. I had to lean down to get through the tiny door.
2. To bend someone or something lower or toward the ground. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lean" and "down." Would you mind leaning that lamp down so I can see what I'm working on? I had leaned the toddler down so he could reach the toy he had dropped on the ground.
See also: down, lean

lean forward

1. To bend or incline toward a position in front of something or oneself. I leaned forward to grab my essay from the professor. The tree leaned so far forward in the wind that I would it would break.
2. To bend or tilt someone or something forward. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lean" and "forward." The doctor leaned the man forward to examine the wound on his lower back. I leaned the box forward to try to read the label on the bottom.
See also: forward, lean

lean in

1. To bend or incline closer to the interior or central point of something, such as a structure, classroom, group of people, etc. I had to lean in to hear what the professor was saying. We all leaned in to look at the specimen in the tank. Water damage has caused the wall in our living room to start leaning in.
2. A phrase used to encourage professional women to pursue career advancement and leadership roles. It comes from the title of Sheryl Sandberg's 2013 book Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, about her career and role as a Facebook executive. In the spirit of leaning in, I'm going for that big promotion at work. Sure, the idea of leaning in and taking on more responsibility at the office is nice and all, but it's simply unfeasible for a single mother of three like myself.
See also: lean

lean into (someone or something)

To push into or press against someone or something. People in the audience behind me kept leaning into me throughout the concert. I leaned into the door to keep people from opening it. The wind is so strong in this city that you need to lean into it when you're outside.
See also: lean

lean out (of something)

1. To bend, tilt, or suspend oneself out of something. The helicopter pilot leaned out of the cockpit and signaled for us to get in. Quit leaning out the window like that—you're making me nervous!
2. To bend, tilt, or suspend someone or something out of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lean" and "out." The gangsters leaned him out of the window, threatening to drop him if he didn't pay them what he owed. I leaned the bookcase out the door so Jerry could grab it from the top, then we hauled it out to his truck together.
See also: lean, out

lean over

1. To bend or tilt forward or closer to the ground. OK, everyone, now lean over and touch your toes. The whole building leaned over during the hurricane, with many fearing it would topple over completely.
2. To bend or tilt someone or something gently toward or onto the ground. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lean" and "over." The doctor leaned the man over to examine the wound on his lower back. We'll need to lean the whole machine over so we can access the panel on the bottom.
3. To bend, tilt, or suspend (oneself) across or over the edge of something. I leaned over the cliff and shouted down to the climbers. Tom leaned over the table and whispered something to Janet.
See also: lean, over

lean toward (someone or something)

1. To bend, tilt, or incline in the direction of someone or something. I tried leaning toward the door to hear what they were talking about in the other room. She leaned toward Tom and whispered something in his ear.
2. To have a slight preference for or inclination toward someone, something, or some action. Usually used in a continuous tense. We're leaning toward keeping the company privately held. I'm leaning toward a laptop rather than a desktop computer. We're still leaning toward Jeff, but we still have a few more people to interview for the job.
See also: lean, toward

lean over backward

To expend a lot of energy or effort to do something; to inconvenience oneself. I can't believe how ungrateful you're being, especially since we leaned over backward planning this dinner party for you! Please don't lean over backward preparing for my visit—I'm totally prepared to sleep on your floor!
See also: backward, lean, over

lean against someone or something

to prop oneself against someone or something. The child leaned against her sister to keep warm. I leaned against the back of the chair and went right to sleep.
See also: lean

lean back

[for someone] to recline backwards, usually in a chair. Lean back and make yourself comfortable. Let's lean back and be comfortable.
See also: back, lean

lean back (on someone or something)

to recline backwards, pressing on someone or something. Don't lean back on me! I'm not a chair! Lean back on the couch and tell me what you are thinking.
See also: back, lean

lean back (on someone or something)

to recline backwards, pressing on someone or something. Don't lean back on me! I'm not a chair! Lean back on the couch and tell me what you are thinking.
See also: back, lean

lean down

to bend over. Lean down and tie your shoe before you trip. He leaned down and picked something up from the floor.
See also: down, lean

lean forward

to bend forward. Lean forward a minute so I can put a cushion behind your back. When Betsy leaned forward, she lost her balance and fell.
See also: forward, lean

lean in (to something)

to incline or press into something. You have to lean into the wind when you walk or you will be blown over. As you walk into the wind, lean in a little bit. The north wall of the barn leans in a little. Is it going to fall?
See also: lean

lean over

 
1. to bend over. Lean over and pick the pencil up yourself! I'm not your servant! As Kelly leaned over to tie her shoes, her chair slipped out from under her.
2. to tilt over. The fence leaned over and almost fell. As the wind blew, the tree leaned over farther and farther.
See also: lean, over

lean over backwards

(to do something) Go to fall over backwards (to do something).
See also: backward, lean, over

lean something against someone or something

to prop something against someone or something. She leaned her spade against the house and wiped the sweat from her brow. Bill leaned the mirror against his leg while he screwed the hook into the wall.
See also: lean

lean something forward

to tilt or bend something forward. Lean the board forward a little bit, please. Someone leaned this panel forward a little too much.
See also: forward, lean

lean over backward

See bend over backward.
See also: backward, lean, over
References in periodicals archive ?
The object of the acquisition is the support of the Leaning operating model of the EVERYDAY PROCESS process.
"We can't keep getting by with the Leaning Tower alone," Pisa's Heritage Councilor Salvatore Sanzo (http://www.ansa.it/english/news/lifestyle/arts/2017/02/27/pisa-oks-ferris-wheel_32ec8945-2dc3-4b7e-b7e3-421f66e64bd8.html) said to ANSA.
The Leaning Tower of Pisa, which sits in Italy's famous Piazza del Duomo, has drawn in roughly one million sightseers each year.
Figure 4 is a photograph that shows a cross-sectional view of the rear tire of this motorcycle and how it contacts the ground when the motorcycle is leaning on its kickstand (with no rider).
Whatever your belief, 5-S projects can be helpful when leaning your operations, and they're not that difficult to perform.
(Several works have a deliberately unfinished feel, as if completion would expose them to complicity with commerce.) Components hang together uneasily: Diagonally placed cardboard-box pieces and the crawl spaces they create look like they might protect a skid-row sleeper; blue landmasses float Gondwanaland-like against dull gray "seas" on large maplike canvases; a little, leaning wood panel painted a lusterless orange and sky blue looks like Kara Walker's silhouettes, digits seemingly reaching upward in an ambiguous gesture commingling hope, degradation, and despair.
This will initiate the curve or arc and put the athlete in a leaning position away from the bar.
This book is designed to give teachers, counselors, gifted education specialists, and parents an understanding of the specific leaning style components that characterize gifted adolescents in their culture.
Acquisition of the CUSTOMER PROCESS OF HEALTH AND WELL-BEING CENTERS IN THE MULTI-FUNCTION MODE - support for the process leaning process.
Seven years ago, in the thick of the war of words on engine leaning ignited by General Aviation Modifications, Lycoming published an engine operating bulletin with this statement: