lean in

lean in

To bend or incline closer to the interior or central point of something, such as a structure, classroom, group of people, etc. I had to lean in to hear what the professor was saying. We all leaned in to look at the specimen in the tank. Water damage has caused the wall in our living room to start leaning in.
See also: lean

lean in (to something)

to incline or press into something. You have to lean into the wind when you walk or you will be blown over. As you walk into the wind, lean in a little bit. The north wall of the barn leans in a little. Is it going to fall?
See also: lean
References in periodicals archive ?
Both appear often, and uncontroversially, in Lean In.
For all of Sandberg's social fluidity, she is taking a risk with Lean In.
The curved base flexes as you move, allowing you to lean in any direction giving a full range of motion and being curved it won't damage your lawn like many garden seats.