lead out of

lead out of (something or some place)

1. Of a path or route, to continue or end up out of something or some place. This trail should lead out of the forest and back to the parking lot. That's the highway leading out of New York.
2. To guide or direct someone or an animal out of something or some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lead" and "down." We've got to lead the herd out of the valley before this storm hits. Firefighters began leading people out of the burning building.
See also: lead, of, out

lead (someone or an animal) out of something

 and lead (someone or an animal) out
to guide someone or an animal out of something or some place. Someone finally led the hiker out of the valley or he would still be there now. She led out the striking workers.
See also: lead, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
As she puts it, "What sense does it make for `Bewitched' to lead out of `Sally Jessy Raphael'?