leach in

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leach in

To enter (some substance or material) through percolation. Rising seas have allowed high concentrations of salt to leach in across these coastal farmlands. After the spill, acids and other toxins began leaching in on the cliffsides.
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leach in (to something)

[for a substance] to seep or penetrate into something. The salt leached into the soil and ruined it. A tremendous amount of salt leached in.
See also: leach
References in periodicals archive ?
The average of nitrogen losses through leaching in the beginning of the season, in the middle of season and at the end of season during two years experiments is shown in Fig.
The chemical equations for PbS leaching in acid solution with and without oxidants are following:
In a separate experiment, the scientists compared leaching in 10 minutes of contact between condom rubber and artificial sweat with the effect of an hour-long exposure.
In several other reports examining CCA leaching, the order of leaching in seawater is Cu > Cr > As (Weis et al.
The estimated high N[O.sub.3.sup.-]-N leaching losses from a grazed paddock in the grazing only scenario demonstrate, again, the importance of `hot' urine spots in causing N[O.sub.3.sup.-] leaching in grazed pastures (Table 5).
Results of the RMT and UW research demonstrated that the relationship between leach tests and field leaching is complex and that chemical and physical influences on leaching in both laboratory and field testing need to be understood before extrapolating laboratory test results to the field.
Eight blocks were treated with each solution to provide three blocks for leaching in water or citrate buffer, with two blocks being retained for reference.
We have studied effects of CCA leaching in estuaries and salt marshes for over a decade and have clear evidence of harm, especially in poorly flushed areas and particularly with new wood.
1979), although recently there have been observations of organic N leaching in British soils (D.
Cutting emissions would slow a forest's rate of degradation, he acknowledges, "but not rebuild the cations -- like calcium -- back up in the forest floor." Indeed, he notes, acid leaching in some places appears to have removed in just 40 to 50 years some 500 years' worth of calcium laid down naturally.