leach

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leach away

1. To become dissolved, eroded, or carried away, by or as by some percolating liquid. Nutrients in the soil have continued leaching away as the groundwater become more acidic. The calcium in the sandstone leached away over time as water levels rose.
2. To dissolve, erode, or carry something away due to percolation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "leach" and "away." Increasingly acidic water has been leaching away important minerals from the land. Over time, the saltwater leached the limestone away all along the coastline.
See also: away, leach

leach in

To enter (some substance or material) through percolation. Rising seas have allowed high concentrations of salt to leach in across these coastal farmlands. After the spill, acids and other toxins began leaching in on the cliffsides.
See also: leach

leach into (something)

To enter into some substance or material through percolation. Rising seas have allowed high concentrations of salt to leach into the soil across these coastal farmlands. After the spill, acids and other toxins began leaching into the cliffsides these birds call home.
See also: leach

leach out

1. To become dissolved, eroded, or carried out (of something), by or as if by some percolating liquid. Nutrients have continued leaching out of the soil as the groundwater become more acidic. As water levels rose above the layers of sandstone, calcium slowly leached out over time.
2. To dissolve, erode, or carry something out (of something else) due to percolation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "leach" and "out." Increasingly acidic water has been leaching important minerals out of the land. He said that, over time, the saltwater would leach out the calcium within the limestone.
See also: leach, out

leach out of (something)

1. To become dissolved, eroded, or carried out of some substance, by or as if by some percolating liquid. Nutrients have continued leaching out of the soil as the groundwater become more acidic. Calcium leached out of the sandstone over time as water levels continued to rise.
2. To dissolve, erode, or carry something out of due to percolation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "leach" and "out of." Increasingly acidic water has been leaching important minerals out of the land. Over time, the saltwater leached the limestone out of the cliffs along the coastline.
See also: leach, of, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

leach away

[for something] to erode or wash away gradually by leaching. The soft sandstone leached away under the constant rains. The flowerpots sat out in the rain, where all the nutrients in the soil leached away.
See also: away, leach

leach in (to something)

[for a substance] to seep or penetrate into something. The salt leached into the soil and ruined it. A tremendous amount of salt leached in.
See also: leach

leach out of something

[for a substance] to seep or drain out of something. All the nutrients leached out of the soil and nothing would grow. The phosphorus leached out of the soil after a few years.
See also: leach, of, out

leach something away (from something)

 and leach something out (of something); leach something out; leach something away
to remove something from something by leaching. The heavy rains leached nutrients away from the soil. The rains leached away the nutrients.
See also: away, leach
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Catalan, "Effects of carbonation on the leachability and compressive strength of cement-solidified and geopolymer-solidified synthetic metal wastes," Journal of Environmental Management, vol.
Utilization of oil shale ash to prepare PCC: Leachability dynamics and equilibrium in the ash-water system.
Investigations of leachability show that mobility of a given element strongly depends on the structure which immobilizes it.
In addition, the leachability of hazardous metals from the solidified sludge was evaluated for ensuring the environmental safety.
20% cement in both 75% contaminated marine mud and sediment), the extent of heavy metal leaching was well controlled within the universal treatment standard, especially for Cu in the sediment with 93% reduction in its leachability, not posing any adverse health and environmental impacts.
Investigations of ash topography/morphology and their relationship with heavy metals leachability. Environ.
Evaluation of new quaternary ammonium compound, didecyldimethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (DBF) in comparison with DDAC: leachability and termite resistance tests.
Alvarez JM, Rico MI, Obrador A (1997) Leachability and distribution of zinc applied to an acid soil as Controlled-release zinc chelates.
[11] reported that the addition of alkaline residue in the contaminated soils could significantly reduce the leachability of [Pb.sup.2+] to an acceptable level and the removal efficiency strongly depended on the pH value in the soils.
Finally, leachability of heavy metals in the samples was studied using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) according to EPA method 1311 (Environmental Protection Agency, Method 13-11,1992) [35].
(2004) on leachability of sandy soil contaminated by Pb at rate of 3800 mg [kg.sup.-1], treated using PC, lime and lime-FA mixtures, showed that S/S treatments significantly reduced Pb leaching (below the regulatory concentration) in all performed tests and that Pb concentration in the leachate is mainly controlled by the leachate pH.
An environmental aspect relating to leachability of CCA from hardwood and softwood poles in Bangladesh.
In the case of the Myrviken shale (Jamtland, Borehole 78004 and 78009, 70 to 80 meters) the oil yield is zero, even with HYTORT hydrogenation, but metals leachability is high.
Pore volume, therefore, may not be an appropriate characteristic for the leachability of strychnine through a soil column when the soil clay is of expanding type.
and Song et al.'s research, cement can be utilized as a binder to effectively reduce the leachability of As and Pb in mine tailing [11-14].