leach in

leach in

To enter (some substance or material) through percolation. Rising seas have allowed high concentrations of salt to leach in across these coastal farmlands. After the spill, acids and other toxins began leaching in on the cliffsides.
See also: leach

leach in (to something)

[for a substance] to seep or penetrate into something. The salt leached into the soil and ruined it. A tremendous amount of salt leached in.
See also: leach
References in periodicals archive ?
Jack Dyson was up first against Ryan Leach in the final.
Another somewhat damaged tile is on the newer [1922] home of Edgar Skinner, the Leach Pottery accountant, the house it seems, where Japanese potter Shoji Hamada--who set up the Leach Pottery with Leach in 1920--would bathe.
Simulation results confirmed that the modified LEACH outperforms pure LEACH in extending WSN battery life.
Yi-Seok, Dong-Reyol, "A mobile agent based leach in wireless sensor networks," in 10th International Conference on Advanced Communication Technology, pp.
They have proved that their protocols outperform other attractive routing protocols such as LEACH in prolonging the network lifetime.
The operation of LEACH in the every round can be separated into two phases: the setup phase and the steady phase.
The essays are personal, a little folksy, and definitely upbeat--just like Leach in real life.
LED AWAY: Leach CORNERED: Leach with Cambodian cop NOWHERE TO HIDE Michael Leach in handcuffs on the end of the double bed
He returned to England with Leach in 1920 and they established the Leach Pottery at St Ives in Cornwall, where they built the first traditional Japanese wood burning kiln in Europe.
Elemental arsenic and copper account for approximately 22 percent and 14.4 percent of the initial preservative oxides content, respectively, but leach in greater quantities.
He lost control during an argument and stabbed Mr Leach in the arm with a lock knife.