lay (someone or something) to rest

(redirected from lay them to rest)

lay (someone or something) to rest

1. To bury someone who has died. Paul will be laid to rest on Saturday, and I plan to go to the funeral service.
2. By extension, to stop or finish discussing, thinking about, or focusing on something. OK, I think we have to agree to disagree. Let's just lay the issue to rest and stop arguing. Why are you still being so jealous? I thought we'd laid this all to rest ages ago.
See also: lay, rest

lay someone to rest

Euph. to bury a dead person. They laid her to rest by her mother and father, out in the old churchyard. We gather together today to lay our beloved son to rest.
See also: lay, rest

lay to rest

1. See lay at rest.
2. Bury someone, as in She wanted to be laid to rest beside her husband. This usage replaced the earlier go to rest. [Late 1800s]
See also: lay, rest

lay something to rest

or

put something to rest

If you lay something such as fears or rumours to rest or if you put them to rest, you succeed in proving that they are not true. His speech should lay those fears to rest. I am determined to put to rest these rumours that we are in financial trouble.
See also: lay, rest, something

lay something to rest

soothe and dispel fear, anxiety, grief, and similar unpleasant emotions.
See also: lay, rest, something

lay somebody to ˈrest

(formal) bury somebody: He was laid to rest beside his parents.
See also: lay, rest, somebody

lay something to ˈrest

stop something by showing that it is not true: The media speculation about their relationship has finally been laid to rest.
See also: lay, rest, something

lay to rest

Bury; also, settle something with finality. In the first sense, this expression dates from the late nineteenth century, although rest in the sense of death was so used from about 1400 on. It appears in an American cowboy song, “And they laid him down to rest, with a lily on his chest.” In the second sense, it was earlier expressed as set at rest and dates from Shakespeare’s day. Charles Kingsley used the present locution in Westward Ho! (1855): “His fears, such as they were, were laid to rest.”
See also: lay, rest
References in periodicals archive ?
Airdrie and Coatbridge Advertiser, One Central Quay, Glasgow, G3 8DA Or email us news@airdrieandcoatbridgeadvertiser.co.uk Dear Editor, Losing a son or daughter at any age is horrific; to then expect parents to pay sizeable fees to lay them to rest just compounds the pain.
He said he eventually hopes to lay them to rest in Palestine.
IF THERE were any lingering doubts that Saoirse Ronan is one of the world's most exciting young actresses, her turn in this period drama should lay them to rest. The 21-year-old gives a performance sure to garner gongs come awards season - and the film isn't bad either.
In 2010, Tokyo launched a three-year project to recover more remains, saying it was a question of national duty to bring them back and lay them to rest. Nearly seven decades after the war ended in 1945, Japan is still trying, with limited success, to collect remains of its war dead.
About 54 bodies were handed to their families who arrived in the capital of Moroni on Saturday to lay them to rest.
I fold the arms of my glasses before sleep and lay them to rest.
Brooklyn 112 mins 12a IF THERE were any doubts Saoirse Ronan is one of the world's most exciting young actresses, her turn in this period drama should lay them to rest.
How do we lay them to rest, the ones we call ours, their many parts drifting in directions we fail to recognize, then settling--discrete, isolate, beyond our modest senses?