lay over

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lay over

1. verb To place something over the top of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "lay" and "over." If you lay the baby's favorite blanket over her, she should stop crying. Once we lay over the crust, we'll put it in the over.
2. verb To stop briefly in a journey before continuing on to another destination. I'm going to lay over in Dallas on my way home.
3. verb To delay or postpone something. You know, we can lay over some of this work until tomorrow—we don't have to do it all today.
4. noun A brief stop in a journey before continuing on to one's final destination. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. I have a layover in Dallas on my way home.
See also: lay, over
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lay something over someone or something

to cover someone or something with something. Here, lay this blanket over the baby. Please lay a napkin over the bread before you take it to the table.
See also: lay, over

lay over (some place)

to pause some place during one's journey. I had to lay over in San Antonio for a few hours before my plane left. I want a bus that goes straight through. I don't want to lay over.
See also: lay, over
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lay over

1. Postpone, as in This issue will have to be laid over until our next meeting. [Late 1800s]
2. Make a stop in the course of a journey, as in They had to lay over for two days in New Delhi until the next flight to Katmandu. This sense gave rise to the noun lay-over for such a stopover. [Late 1800s]
See also: lay, over
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lay over

v.
To temporarily interrupt or delay someone's journey in order to rest, refuel, do repairs, or change vehicles. Used chiefly in the passive: Because it was snowing, we were laid over in Albany for four hours.
See also: lay, over
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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