lay


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lay

1. tv. to copulate [with] someone. (Crude. Usually objectionable.) She laid him on the spot.
2. n. a sexual act. (Crude. Usually objectionable.) I could use a good lay about now.
3. n. a person considered as a potential sex partner. (Crude. Usually objectionable.) He actually said that she was a good lay.

lay (one's)

/a finger on
To locate; find: We haven't been able to lay a finger on those photos.

lay

/put to rest
1. To bury (a dead body); inter.
2. To resolve or settle (an issue, for example): The judge's ruling put to rest the dispute between the neighbors.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
and is forced to lay out the police report, arrest record,
In a 2004 agreement between the IRS and Enron, Enron characterized the purchase of the annuity contracts as compensation and issued a W-2 to the Lays.
Brook, eds, The Old French Lays of Ignaure, Oiselet and Amours (Gallica), Woodbridge & Rochester, D.
A further chapter focuses on the contemplative revival, characterized by a common ideal of strict reform and a role for lay women in providing spiritual guidance.
In contrast, the closer the family ties within a species' colonies, the more likely the workers were to lay illicit eggs while the queen was alive.
Lay, aged 64, died of a heart attack, his pastor in Houston said.
You probably immediately spotted the problem in "it lay the groundwork"--an unintentionally amusing lie-lay error in a story about a man named Lay.
For Crow, 26, this lay movement, sponsored by the Legion of Christ, a religious order of priests, felt like a natural way of life.
LAY ADMINISTRATORS ARE INCREASINGLY taking the helm at Catholic institutions of higher learning, which were traditionally led by priests and nuns.
In the event you do have to legitimately lay off employees, bring those individuals back into the fold as much as possible.
Key things that were emphasized in LBW include the following: baptismal accents in various liturgies; centrality of both word and sacrament each Lord's day; a clear Paschal focus; use of lay assisting ministers; fuller congregational participation; variations that provide a spectrum from a simple rite to a festive and full rite; ecumenical convergence; fuller use of psalms; appeal to all the senses; expanded use of the Bible in liturgy and lectionary; new liturgical music and hymns; a strong use of trinitarian language; more inclusive language; a stress on thanksgiving; a fuller resource for daily prayer; rich rites for Holy Week and the Triduum.
I would like to make a comment about the prominent, dare I say liberal, use of the term "ministry" or "ministries" in the section on Lay Movements in the November issue.
Although they differ in scope and methods, the two books sharing this review also share a central theme: Italian lay women as saints or prospective saints and the processes of saint-making in the later middle ages.
But while Lay agrees corporate bonds backed by well-known firms can be a good value, he's shying away from the corporate sector He thinks spreads--the difference in yield between corporates and Treasuries--will continue to widen.
AMONG THE MANY REASONS GIVE FOR THE DISMISSAL OF LAY COACHES ARE: