laugh out of

laugh out of

1. To lose an opportunity because one was mocking or laughing derisively at someone or something else. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is used between "laugh" and "out." He couldn't help by snicker at the interviewer's speech impediment, and in doing so laughed himself right out of a job. You think my new bicycle looks silly, do you? Well, you just laughed yourself out of an invitation to my birthday party.
2. To cause or pressure one to leave some place or position by mocking, ridiculing, or laughing at them derisively. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "laugh" and "out." When his invention broke down on stage, the audience laughed the poor guy out of the building. People are going to laugh her out of office when they find out about this.
See also: laugh, of, out

laugh oneself out of something

to lose out on something because one has made light of it or laughed at it. While you were howling with laughter about my hat, you laughed yourself out of a ride to town. The bus just pulled away. You laugh too much. You just laughed yourself out of a job.
See also: laugh, of, out

laugh someone out of something

to force someone to leave a place by laughing in ridicule. The citizens laughed the speaker out of the hall. We laughed the city council out of the auditorium.
See also: laugh, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
The Birdcage (1996) - This effective remake of the hysterically funny French farce, ``La Cage Aux Folles,'' squeezes every possible laugh out of an absurd situation: A gay couple must pretend to be straight for an afternoon to impress the straight-laced parents of the woman who plans to marry the son of one of the gays.
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