latchkey child

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latchkey child

A child who is home alone after school or in general because their parents or guardians are at work. I know it makes me sound horrible, but I just don't want Tommy hanging out with those latchkey children from down the road. Being a latchkey child was tough at times, but it taught me the value of self-reliance at an earlier age than most.
See also: child, latchkey
References in periodicals archive ?
Some professionals seem to believe that older latchkey children develop a greater sense of responsibility and a concomitant enhancement of their self-images than do "supervised" children; other professionals think not.
Mothers reported more hyperactivity and misbehavior among the 28 latchkey children than among youngsters returning to a parent or another adult after school.
Although homework programs help latchkey children, Brewer comments that: "It is ironic that with the continuing `problem' of latchkey children, so many libraries have reference policies that discriminate against homework questions" (p.
Schools can help meet the needs of latchkey children in many ways.
I might do some traveling, but primarily I'd like to set up an after-school center for latchkey children.
Data collected from over 2,100 parents of eighth grade students found that latchkey children were twice as likely to try at least one of these substances than similar children who had adult supervision after school.
So-called latchkey children, who routinely care for themselves without adult supervision, run a higher risk of alcohol, marijuana or cigarette use than do children who are supervised after school and in the evening, according to a new scientific report.
Many latchkey children are without direct supervision part of the day.
Each day, nearby Hale Middle School disgorges dozens of latchkey children whose parents pick them up from the library after work.
The two-worker family with latchkey children now is the norm.
Library programs addressing the needs of young undereducated mothers who are often unemployed, or programs addressing the problems that latchkey children bring to the library, directly address an economic situation.
Main Street is a "full-service" center for babies, toddlers, preschoolers, and latchkey children.
Researchers who conducted a survey of 349 third graders in an affluent Dallas suburb report thatk one child out of four has no adult supervision after school; but these latchkey children do not demonstrate poor social, emotional or intellectual development, as an earlier study had suggested.
are without adult supervision after school and, left to their own devices, these latchkey children are vulnerable to accidents, mistreatment, and wayward actions, unless precautions are taken.
The first-year findings revealed that while 21st-Century after-school centers changed where and with whom students spent some of their after-school time and increased parental involvement, they had limited influence on academic performance, no influence on feelings of safety or on the number of latchkey children, and negative influences on behavior.