latchkey child

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latchkey child

A child who is home alone after school or in general because their parents or guardians are at work. I know it makes me sound horrible, but I just don't want Tommy hanging out with those latchkey children from down the road. Being a latchkey child was tough at times, but it taught me the value of self-reliance at an earlier age than most.
See also: child, latchkey
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
First, educators should help design curricular programs that would help latchkey children (and their parents) determine the logistical means and the responsibilities of self-care arrangements (Lilly, 1992).
Mothers reported more hyperactivity and misbehavior among the 28 latchkey children than among youngsters returning to a parent or another adult after school.
(1984), "What Home Economists Should Know About Latchkey Children," Journal of Home Economics, 76 (4) (Winter): 20-22.
We read about high divorce rates, teenage pregnancy, single-parent families, latchkey children, and so forth.
ERIC Descriptors: After School Programs; City Government; Partnerships in Education; Latchkey Children; School Community Programs; School Community Relationship; Educational Quality; Program Improvement; Change Strategies; Community Involvement; Family Work Relationship; Government Role; Community Resources; Community Coordination; Stakeholders; Educational Needs; Outreach Programs; Guidelines
Kwame's first taste of fame came in Grange Hill, after which he took a lead role the 80s series The Latchkey Children.
Parents, particularly those who see nothing wrong in raising latchkey children and who are violent and abusive in their own behavior, also can be blamed.
Are there many latchkey children? Are families poor or well-off or both?
Latchkey children constitute approximately one-third of all school children, or 5 million children between the ages of 5 and 13 (Stangler & Kiulahan, 1993).
"I might do some traveling, but primarily I'd like to set up an after-school center for latchkey children."
By the year 2000, there will be almost 10 million children under the age of five who have working mothers and 33 million children under the age of 15, so called "latchkey children;" and up to 5 million people over the age of 85.
These kids, commonly called "latchkey children," spend a lot of time without adult supervision.
So-called latchkey children, who routinely care for themselves without adult supervision, run a higher risk of alcohol, marijuana or cigarette use than do children who are supervised after school and in the evening, according to a new scientific report.
Many latchkey children are without direct supervision part of the day.
ERIC Descriptors: Leadership; After School Programs; Technical Assistance; Public Support; Educational Opportunities; Youth Opportunities; Urban Schools; Latchkey Children; Improvement Programs; Program Effectiveness; Program Evaluation; Formative Evaluation; Change Strategies; Youth Programs; Integrated Activities; Integrated Services; Community Involvement; School Community Programs; Educational Quality; State Standards; Educational Resources; Partnerships in Education; Empowerment; Academic Achievement; Program Descriptions