lark

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happy as a lark

Very happy; contented. I've been happy as a lark ever since we moved to the countryside. Johnny's in a bit of a bad mood, but just give him a new toy to play with and he'll be happy as a lark.
See also: happy, lark

on a lark

On a whim or fancy; for fun or as a joke. On a lark, we all decided to ditch our Friday classes and drive to New York City for the weekend.
See also: lark, on

up with the lark(s)

Awake at a particularly early hour, especially at or before sunrise (i.e., the hour when larks sing). Primarily heard in UK. I'm sorry, but I have to get going. I have to be up with the lark tomorrow. Mum is up with the larks every day to prepare breakfast for the farmhands.
See also: up

be up with the lark(s)

To be awake at a particularly early hour, especially at or before sunrise (i.e., the hour when larks sing). I don't know how he does it, but my husband is up with the lark every single morning. I won't have another pint, thanks. I have to be up with the larks tomorrow, so I'd better head home soon.
See also: up

blow that for a lark

slang A phrase used to dismiss something because it seems too taxing. Primarily heard in UK. Well, blow that for a lark! I'll just return the book tomorrow instead of going out in a snowstorm today.
See also: blow, lark, that

sod that for a lark

rude slang A phrase used to dismiss something because it seems too taxing. Primarily heard in UK. Well, sod that for a lark! I'll just return the book tomorrow instead of going out in a snowstorm today.
See also: lark, sod, that

rise with the lark

To wake and get out of bed at sunrise. I've always loved camping: rising with the lark, cooking breakfast over an open fire, exploring the great outdoor—it's all wonderful!
See also: lark, rise

for a lark and on a lark

for a joke; as something done for fun. For a lark, I wore a clown's wig to school. On a lark, I skipped school and drove to the beach.
See also: and, lark, on

happy as the day is long

Also, happy as a lark; happy as a clam (at high tide). Extremely glad, delighted, very cheerful, as in He was happy as the day is long, or When she heard the news she was happy as a lark, or Once I got the test results I was happy as a clam at high tide. The first of these similes dates from the late 1700s. The second alludes to the lark's beautiful, seemingly very happy, song. The third, from the early 1800s, alludes to the fact that clams can only be dug at low tide and therefore are safe at high tide; it is often shortened to happy as a clam.
See also: happy, long

lark it up

Also, lark about. Have a noisy, exuberant good time. For example, We were larking it up when the supervisor walked in, or He's always larking about at night. These expressions employ lark in the sense of "to frolic," a usage dating from the early 1800s. Also see cut up.
See also: lark, up

happy as a lark

If you are happy as a lark, you are very happy. Look at me — eighty-two years old and happy as a lark!
See also: happy, lark

up with the lark

mainly BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If you are up with the lark, you get up very early in the morning. Most bakers are up with the lark. Note: A lark is a British bird that is well-known for its tuneful early morning song.
See also: lark, up

up with the lark

up very early in the morning.
References to the early-morning singing of the lark date back to the 16th century: the first recorded instance is found in John Lyly 's Euphues. Early risers are often referred to as larks , while their late-to-bed counterparts may be described as owls . The phrase also employs a play on the word up , since the lark sings on the wing while flying high above its nest.
See also: lark, up

be ˌup/ˌrise with the ˈlark

get up early in the morning: She was up with the lark this morning.A lark in this idiom refers to a kind of bird that sings early in the day.
See also: lark, rise, up

blow/sodtaboo ˈthat for a lark

(British English, slang) used by somebody who does not want to do something because it involves too much effort: Sod that for a lark! I’m not doing any more tonight.
A lark is a thing that you do for fun or as a joke.
See also: blow, lark, sod, that
References in periodicals archive ?
Far from the larkish cameos on Friends or the more boundary-pushing experiments like 24 or Sex and the City, Boston Legal seems to be little more than slick, mainstream entertainment.
The Osbournes'' launched in March as a larkish attempt to meld ``Ozzie and Harriet'' with Ozzy and Sharon.
One of the most valuable aspects of Rockaway's larkish account is the attention he pays to the Jewish mob in cities other than New York and Chicago, which generally claim all the attention both in popular cultural representations and in historical accounts.
In the 1880s, for example, he and Baxter concocted a mock correspondence between "Thomson" and "Johnson," Scots characters of their larkish invention.
and Will Ferrell's larkish, off-the-cuff takes in the Anchorman movies, it's easy to forget the form's sturdy theatrical foundations.
McDonagh's play seems powered more by larkish feigned rage than by genuine moral outrage.