larger


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Related to larger: larger than life

be larger than life

To be (or seem) more important, impressive, or exciting than the average person or thing. Celebrities are always larger than life to their fans. Have you seen the new stadium? It really seems like it's larger than life when you're inside.
See also: larger, life

larger than life

More important, impressive, or exciting than the average person or thing. Celebrities are always larger than life to their fans. Have you seen the new stadium? It really seems like it's larger than life when you're inside.
See also: larger, life

*big as life (and twice as ugly)

 and *large as life (and twice as ugly); bigger than life (and twice as ugly)
Cliché a colorful way of saying that a person or a thing appeared, often surprisingly or dramatically, in a particular place. (*Also: as ~.) The little child just stood there as big as life and laughed very hard. I opened the door, and there was Tom as large as life. I came home and found this cat in my chair, as big as life and twice as ugly.
See also: big, life

*large as life

Fig. in person; actually, and sometimes surprisingly, present at a place. (*Also: as ~.) I thought Jack was away, but there he was as large as life. Jean was not expected to appear, but she turned up large as life.
See also: large, life

larger than life

Fig. [of someone] having an aura of greatness, perhaps not supported by the real person. Perry seemed larger than life to those who had only read about him. To the rest of us, he was a boor. To the children, the star athlete who spoke at the school assembly seemed larger than life.
See also: larger, life

big as life

Also, large as life. In person, as in And there was Mary, big as life, standing right in front of me. This phrase transfers the same size as in real life (life-size) to an actual appearance. Sometimes this term is embellished with and quite as natural, presumably alluding to a likeness of a person or thing that closely resembles the real thing. A similar addition is and twice as natural, which doesn't make sense. [Late 1800s]
2. Also, larger than life; big as all outdoors. On a grand scale, as in The soap opera could well be called a larger-than-life drama, or That friend of his was as big as all outdoors. This phrase can be used either literally, for larger than life-size (second example) or figuratively. The phrase all outdoors has been used to compare something or someone to an immensity since the early 1800s.
See also: big, life

large as life

Also, larger than life. See big as life.
See also: large, life

large as life

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

big as life

AMERICAN
If you say that someone is somewhere, large as life, you mean that you are surprised and sometimes shocked to see them there. And now she was back, large as life, to claim her inheritance. Amos walked big as life into the diner and took his time over the menu.
See also: large, life

larger than life

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

bigger than life

AMERICAN
COMMON If you describe someone as larger than life, you mean that they have a very strong personality and behave in a way that makes people notice them. She was larger than life yet intensely human, brilliant yet warm. He's bigger than life, and she's quiet and humble. Note: Larger-than-life is often used before nouns. John Huston was a larger-than-life character, whose temperament was as dramatic as any of the characters in his own films.
See also: larger, life

large as life

(of a person) conspicuously present. informal
This expression was originally used literally, with reference to the size of a statue or portrait relative to the original: in the mid 18th century Horace Walpole described a painting as being ‘as large as the life’. The humorous mid 19th-century elaboration of the expression, large as life and twice as natural , used by Lewis Carroll and others, is still sometimes found; it is attributed to the Canadian humorist T. C. Haliburton ( 1796–1865 ).
See also: large, life

larger than life

1 (of a person) attracting attention because their appearance or behaviour is more flamboyant than that of ordinary people. 2 (of a thing) seeming disproportionately important.
1996 Face I feel that Keith from The Prodigy has been your best cover this year—he is London, in your face, loud and larger than life.
See also: larger, life

(as) large as ˈlife

(humorous) used of somebody who is seen in person, often unexpectedly: I thought she’d left the country, but there she was, large as life, in the supermarket!
See also: large, life

larger than ˈlife

looking or behaving in a way that is more interesting or exciting than other people, and so is likely to attract attention: He’s one of those larger than life characters.
See also: larger, life

large as/larger than life, as

Life-size, appearing to be real; on a grand scale. The first expression may be an English version of a much older Latin saying, ad vivum, or “to the life.” It dates from the late eighteenth century, when it appeared in Maria Edgeworth’s Lame Jervas (1799): “I see the puppets, the wheelbarrows, everything as large as life.” In the nineteenth century a number of writers not only used the term but added to it, “and quite as natural.” Among them were Cuthbert Bede (1853), Lewis Carroll (in Through the Looking Glass, 1871), and George Bernard Shaw (1893). A similar addition, essentially meaningless, was “and twice as natural.” The second version, larger than life, conveys the idea of being on a grand or heroic scale. A less alliterative form, big as life, is sometimes used.
See also: large, larger
References in periodicals archive ?
The court referred the matter to the CJP for the constitution of a seven-judge larger bench to consider the matter, adding that a larger bench's verdict can reverse hundred year jurisprudence on the point pertaining to the registration of FIRs.
Earlier on Sept 23, the IHC constituted a larger bench to hear the petition Asif's disqualification.Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf's (PTI) Usman Dar had submitted a plea to the IHC regarding the former defence minister's dismissal on the pretext of Iqama.
The Pt catalyst containing larger Pt-hydroxide clusters exhibited an improved catalytic activity after thermal duration.
The industry needs fewer but larger CROs to best serve the growing needs of its global biopharma customers.
Two of the larger players, Alrosa and De Beers, accounted for 69% of worldwide diamond exploration.
Fall Creek: 1,500 legal-size and 250 larger released upstream of Fall Creek Lake.
Larger bodies are currently taken to crematoria in London or Sittingbourne.
It should be noted that in 2006, the provincial casinos contributed over $100 million to the Ontario Trillium Foundation, which goes to benefit all qualifying charities across the province--including those in the larger centers that already have casinos.
A new book authored by Grant Keppel, CPA, national director of Cost Segregation Partners, Real Estate Cost Segregation: A Practitioners Guide puts cost segregation in its larger depreciation context and discusses the legal authority that support cost segregation.
Rotoline has extended the length of its cylindrical oven that is unique to the company's range of rotational molding equipment, thus enabling the production of larger parts without the need for a larger machine.
However, whereas the BMW shares only drivetrain pieces with its larger brethren, the G35 shares not only its drivetrain, but its basic structure--the Front Mid-ship (FM) platform--with the larger M35/M45 sedan.
(1) When used as a rotational flap, the DNF requires that most or all of the nasal skin be used to close larger nasal detects in the lower nasal area.
Each got either a smaller (17 oz.) or larger (34 oz.) empty bowl and either a smaller (2 oz.) or larger (3 oz.) serving spoon.
* Consumer-driven health plans are becoming a popular option for larger employers, although they're rarely offering them as a full replacement.