lard


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Related to lard: leaf lard

lard-arse

A disparaging term for an obese person. Primarily heard in UK.

tub of lard

A highly derogatory term for an obese person. These glamour magazines make it seem like anyone who's not a cover model is basically a tub of lard.
See also: lard, of, tub

lard (something) with (something)

1. To cover or coat (something) with something rich in or composed of fat. The key to crispy roasted potatoes is to lard them with duck fat before baking. Marinade the turkey crown for at least 12 hours, then lard it with strips of bacon.
2. To fill or inject something with a lot of things that are useless, unwanted, or undesirable. Usually used in reference to nontangible things. Often used in passive constructions. She larded her speech with malicious rhetoric and invective. My dad's stories are always larded with these pointless tangents that seem to drag on for an eternity.
See also: lard

larded with (something)

Containing or thoroughly filled with a lot of something, especially that which is useless, unwanted, or undesirable. Her speech was larded with malicious rhetoric and invective. My dad's stories are always larded with these pointless tangents that seem to drag on for an eternity. The attic was larded with old junk the family had accumulated over four generations.
See also: lard

tub of lard

a fat person. (Insulting.) Who's that tub of lard who just came in? That tub of lard can hardly get through the door.
See also: lard, of, tub

lard with

v.
1. To cover or coat something with lard or a similar fatty substance: The cook larded the rice with pork fat.
2. To enrich or embellish something thoroughly with extra material: The performer larded the monologue with boring stories. The report was larded with unnecessary quotations.
See also: lard

lard

n. the police. (see also bacon, pig, pork.) If the lard catches you violating your parole, you’re through.

lard ass

1. n. someone with very fat buttocks. (see also crisco.) Here comes that lard ass again.
2. n. very large buttocks. (Rude and derogatory.) I’m gonna have to do something about this lard ass of mine.
See also: ass, lard

tub of lard

and tub of guts
n. a fat person. (Cruel. Also a rude term of address.) Shut up, you stupid tub of lard! Who’s that tub of guts who just came in?
See also: lard, of, tub
References in periodicals archive ?
Homesteaders made hot-process lard soap recipes by standing over open cauldrons and kettles, holding pants and skirts away from fires, as they stirred equal amounts of fat and lye water until it became thick.
Spoon 2 cups masa mixture into lard and beat on low speed until fully incorporated (scrape beater and bowl at least once), then beat in 2 more cups masa mixture.
I've only been (starting) for one year, so yeah, I wish I could stay another year," Lard said.
1992), but little information is available on cholesterol removal from lard by crosslinked [beta]-CD.
Somerfield said it has imposed limits on the amount of lard distributed to each of its UK stores, caused by dwindling supplies of the cheap pork cuts used to create the fat.
The lard, a co-manufacture of Pharma ham production, has a multitude of uses in the bakery and ready meals industries.
BBC Radio 1 duo Mark and Lard are going their separate ways and leaving the channel.
Rabbi Eliezer Moshe Fisher, of the Jerusalem Rabbinical Court, issued his official ruling on Wednesday saying, "There is no halachic (Jewish legal) ban on using bags of lard in buses and other places" when saving lives is concerned.
Likewise, Fannie Mae committed $1 trillion through its foundation about three years ago to expand home ownership and revitalize urban or inner-city areas, Lard said.
Cuba could be expected to use 100 percent of any lard it gets for edible purposes," an aide reported back.
The commissioners told me that the only point on which they could get no proof was my statement that men had fallen into the lard vats and gone out to the world as pure leaf lard.
CHEF Tracey Lewis has dished up her own unusual work of art - a Japanese lion sculpture made of lard.
Use only a little bit of vegetable oil or margarine instead of lard, shortening, or butter.
She and her colleagues studied the brains of rats that had been allowed over a threeweek period to eat as much as they wanted of three specially prepared foods: milk protein, a high-carbohydrate mixture of sugar and cornstarch, and lard.