landing


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Related to landing: Moon landing

dead-stick landing

The landing of an air or space craft without power (i.e., one whose control stick is "dead"). (Also written as "deadstick landing.") After the storm knocked out both of the plane's engines, the pilot was forced to performed a harrowing dead-stick landing.
See also: landing

landing strip

1. Literally, a long flat stretch of land used by winged aircraft to land after flight. The flight had to circle the airport for nearly 30 minutes as debris was cleared from the landing strip.
2. slang Pubic hair, especially a woman's, that has been shaved or waxed into a single vertical line directly above the vulva.
See also: landing, strip

land a blow

1. To connect a punch with someone's body or face. The returning champion knocked his opponent out before he could land a single blow.
2. To successfully make a point that proves or supports one's argument. During the debate, she landed a number of blows by hammering on her opponent's questionable connections to offshore tax havens.
See also: blow, land

land a punch

1. To connect a punch with someone's body or face. The returning champion knocked his opponent out before he could land a single punch.
2. To successfully make a point that proves or supports one's argument. During the debate, she landed a number of punches by hammering on her opponent's questionable connections to offshore tax havens.
See also: land, punch

land in (one's) lap

To be received unexpectedly or without effort. I didn't steal the internship from you—it landed in my lap, I swear! Your aunt has decided to get a new car, so her old one might land in your lap.
See also: land, lap

land in

1. To descend from the air and set down in some place or thing. The plane was forced to land in Atlanta due to a problem with its fuel tank. The wasp landed right in the bowl of pudding.
2. Of an aircraft, to perform a landing in the midst of certain weather conditions (e.g., fog, rain, snow, etc.). I don't know how you expect to land in fog as thick as this! The helicopter was forced to land in gale-force winds.
3. To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular situation, especially one that is problematic, dangerous, undesirable, etc. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. You're going to land in a whole heap of trouble if you don't start filing your taxes. I hope you realize that this investigation could land us in prison.
See also: land

land up in

To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular situation, especially one that is problematic, undesirable, dangerous, etc. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. You're going to land in a whole heap of trouble if you don't start filing your taxes. I hope you realize that this investigation could land us in prison.
See also: land, up

land on

1. To descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. The wasp landed on my arm, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again. His ball landed on Mrs. Thomson's rose bush, ruining dozens of the flowers.
2. To become the burden or responsibility of someone, especially very suddenly, unceremoniously, or without prior notice. It always lands on me to deal with the boss's stupid mistakes. Blame for their loss has to land on the team's coaching staff.
See also: land, on

land in on

To appear at someone's house or place of work and become a burden for them, especially suddenly or without prior notice. Sorry for landing in on you like this just before dinner! We were in the area, so we thought we would pop by for a visit. The health inspector landed in on us right when the dinner rush was about to begin.
See also: land, on

land upon

To descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. ("Upon" is a less common, more formal alternative to "on.") The wasp landed upon my arm, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again. His ball landed upon Mrs. Thomson's rose bush, ruining dozens of the flowers.
See also: land, upon

land a blow

 
1. Lit. to strike someone. He kept moving, and I found it almost impossible to land a blow. The boxer landed a blow to the face of his opponent.
2. Fig. to make a point. I think I really landed a blow with that remark about extortion. The point about justice landed a blow.
See also: blow, land

land in something

 
1. Lit. [for an airplane] to return to earth in or near a particular city. We landed in Chicago on time. They could not land in San Francisco, so they flew on to Sacramento.
2. Fig. [for someone] to end up in something, such as a mess, jail, trouble, etc. If you don't mend your ways, you're going to land in jail! Andy is going to land in hot water if he doesn't start paying his bills.
3. [for an airplane] to make a landing in something, such as bad weather, darkness, daylight, fog, etc. You can't land this plane in fog like this. The novice pilot is not capable of landing in the dark.
See also: land

land someone in something

to cause someone to end up in something. His criminal activity finally landed him in jail. You really landed yourself in a fine mess!
See also: land

land (up)on someone or something

to light on someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) A bee landed upon her and frightened her. The spoon I dropped landed on the cake and ruined the icing.
See also: land, on

land in

Also, land up. Arrive at, end in something. For example, This situation could land you in a terrible mess, or I never thought I'd land up with a reward for excellence. These expressions both employ land in the sense of "to end," a usage dating from the late 1600s.
See also: land

land on

see under jump all over; for land on one's feet, see fall on one's feet.
See also: land, on

land in

v.
1. To come down and settle in something after traveling through the air: The fly landed in my soup.
2. To arrive in some situation or condition as a result of a course of action: I landed in court after they fired me.
3. To cause someone or something to arrive in some situation or condition: The company's poor fiscal policies landed it in bankruptcy.
See also: land

land a blow

1. tv. to strike someone. He kept moving, and I found it almost impossible to land a blow.
2. tv. to make a point. I think I really landed a blow with that remark about extortion.
See also: blow, land
References in periodicals archive ?
Space shuttle landings seem unsurprising now, but a quarter-century ago nothing so big - more than 180 feet long - had ever come back from space - at least not in one piece.
The smooth landings you see now with every orbiter flight are the direct result of these simulations,'' said Fullerton, a former Air Force fighter and bomber pilot who after the Enterprise test flights went into space on shuttles Columbia and Challenger.
After four smooth test landings, the fifth flight presented NASA with a surprise.
During one of his simulator landings, Prince Charles had the shuttle wobbling - it's called ``pilot-induced oscillation'' - similar to what Haise and Fullerton experienced for real.
3 -- ran in AV edition only) A Gulfstream observation plane flies above as the space shuttle Endeavour deploys its landing parachute Wednesday morning at Edwards Air Force Base.
Boeing's prototype has successfully hovered before landing.
Late last month, the aircraft completed 17 vertical takeoffs, hovers and vertical landings at the Lockheed Martin plant in Palmdale.
Hyatt Regency Philadelphia at Penn's Landing is the second Hyatt hotel in Philadelphia.
With the opening of Hyatt Regency Philadelphia at Penn's Landing, there are 200 Hyatt hotels and resorts around the world.
The pilot did a low fly-by past the Ontario control tower, and at that point airport officials verified the landing gear was stuck, Spears said.
The flight crew twice tried a maneuver to knock the landing gear free: sharply climbing and accelerating, and then abruptly cutting back the power.
When that technique didn't work, the pilot announced that he would try a hard touch-and-go landing on the one free wheel, in hopes that the hard impact would jolt the other wheel down, Spears said.
Although originally designed for use in unprepared areas, Textron Systems' MMLS is equally efficient for restoring landing services to airports when fixed-base landing capabilities are interrupted.