landed


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land (one) in the doghouse

slang To cause one to be in great disfavor (with someone else) as a result of one's misdeeds or blunders. If I come home late from work again this week, it's really going to land me in the doghouse with my wife.
See also: doghouse, land

land (someone) one

To punch someone very hard. When he made that comment about their mother, Pete went up and landed him one right in the eye.
See also: land, one

land (something)

To successfully acquire something, such as a job or piece of information. The economy is still in terrible shape—I haven't been able to land a job for months. Tom landed a really juicy story about the senator's ex-wife.
See also: land

land a blow

1. To be successful in one's attempt to punch someone (as opposed to trying to punch and missing). The returning champion knocked his opponent out before he could land a single blow.
2. By extension, to successfully make a point that proves or supports one's argument. During the debate, she landed a number of blows by hammering on her opponent's questionable connections to offshore tax havens.
See also: blow, land

land a punch

1. To be successful in one's attempt to punch someone (as opposed to trying to punch and missing). The returning champion knocked his opponent out before he could land a single punch.
2. By extension, to successfully make a point that proves or supports one's argument. During the debate, she landed a number of punches by hammering on her opponent's questionable connections to offshore tax havens.
See also: land, punch

land a/the knockout blow

1. In boxing and similar sports, to strike someone with a blow that renders them unconscious or technically disqualifies them from continuing. The newcomer landed the knockout blow in the first 30 seconds of the second round. She was behind for nearly the whole match, but she landed an incredible knockout blow that laid her opponent out flat.
2. By extension, to do something that completely and decisively ensures the defeat or downfall of someone or something. The Supreme Court's decision landed a knockout blow to our hopes of overturning the legislation. Their company was already struggling to survive, but the arrival of a new big-box retailer next door landed the knockout blow.
See also: blow, knockout, land

land a/the knockout punch

1. In boxing and similar sports, to strike someone with a blow that renders them unconscious or technically disqualifies them from continuing. The newcomer landed the knockout punch in the first 30 seconds of the second round. She was behind for nearly the whole match, but she landed an incredible knockout punch that laid her opponent out flat.
2. By extension, to do something that completely and decisively ensures the defeat or downfall of someone or something. The Supreme Court's decision landed a knockout punch to our hopes of overturning the legislation. Their company was already struggling to survive, but the arrival of a new big-box retailer next door landed the knockout punch.
See also: knockout, land, punch

land at

1. To come to rest or port some place in a ship or plane. Due to choppy conditions in the harbor, we had to wait for nearly four hours before we could land at shore. We ended up having to land at Minnesota 30 minutes into the flight because there was a leak in our fuel tank.
2. To bring an air or sea vessel to rest or port some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "land" and "at." I'm trying to land the boat at the pier, but the current is too strong at the moment. Ladies and gentlemen, we'll be landing the plane at Dublin airport shortly.
See also: land

land in (one's) lap

To be gained or received unexpectedly or without effort. I didn't steal the internship from you—it landed in my lap, I swear! Your aunt has decided to get a new car, so her old one might land in your lap.
See also: land, lap

land in (something or some place)

1. To descend from the air and set down in some place or thing. The plane was forced to land in Atlanta due to a problem with its fuel tank. The wasp landed right in the bowl of pudding.
2. Of an aircraft, to perform a landing in the midst of certain weather conditions (e.g., fog, rain, snow, etc.). I don't know how you expect to land in fog as thick as this! The helicopter was forced to land in gale-force winds.
3. To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular situation, especially one that is problematic, dangerous, undesirable, etc. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. You're going to land in a whole heap of trouble if you don't start filing your taxes. I hope you realize that this investigation could land us in prison.
See also: land

land in on

To appear at someone's house or place of work and become a burden for them, especially suddenly or without prior notice. Sorry for landing in on you like this just before dinner! We were in the area, so we thought we would pop by for a visit. The health inspector landed in on us right when the dinner rush was about to begin.
See also: land, on

land on (one)

1. Literally, to descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. The wasp landed on me, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again.
2. To become the burden or responsibility of someone, especially very suddenly, unceremoniously, or without prior notice. It always lands on me to deal with the boss's stupid mistakes. Blame for their loss has to land on the team's coaching staff.
See also: land, on

land on (something)

To descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. The wasp landed on my arm, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again. His ball landed on Mrs. Thomson's rose bush, ruining dozens of the flowers.
See also: land, on

land on both feet

To come through or survive a tough or uncertain situation successfully or gracefully. I wouldn't worry about Chloe—no matter what bizarre scheme she gets mixed up in, she always lands on both feet. I know you're stressed out about being laid off, but you are so skilled that I know you'll land on both feet.
See also: both, feet, land, on

land the first punch

1. Literally, to strike an opponent first. A: "Who landed the first punch?" B: "Tom, but Ben came back swinging. It's a real fight now!" I swung and missed, so the bully ended up landing the first punch—a direct hit to the nose.
2. To initiate a preemptive verbal attack, accusation, allegation, etc., in order to undermine someone or their agenda. We know they have dirt on us, so our campaign has to get out there and land the first punch in the media.
3. To score the first points in a game. That team is the lowest seed in the playoffs, so I'm shocked that they were able to land the first punch tonight.
See also: first, land, punch

land up (some place)

To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular location, especially unexpectedly. Typically followed by "in." In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. We somehow landed up at Mary's house last night around 3 AM. The bag was put on the wrong flight and landed up in Detroit. I took a wrong turn and landed up miles away from the campsite.
See also: land, up

land up at (some place)

To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular location, especially unexpectedly. We somehow landed up at Mary's house last night around 3 AM. I didn't know what to expect as I landed up at the hotel. Sorry for the long-winded story, but that's how I landed up at Harvard instead of Cornell.
See also: land, up

land up in (something)

To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular situation, especially one that is problematic, undesirable, dangerous, etc. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. You're going to land up in a whole heap of trouble if you don't start filing your taxes. I hope you realize that this investigation could land us up in prison.
See also: land, up

land up with (someone or something)

1. To be with someone, often by default. It seems that we've landed up with the most boring tour guide on the planet. He's seriously putting me to sleep. If you don't start dating more serious guys, you're going to land up with a doofus.
2. To possess something at the end or as a result of something else. We landed up with nothing because the yard sale was a bust. I landed up with a ticket to the concert because one of Nicole's friends couldn't go at the last minute.
See also: land, up

land upon

To descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. ("Upon" is a less common, more formal alternative to "on.") The wasp landed upon my arm, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again. His ball landed upon Mrs. Thomson's rose bush, ruining dozens of the flowers.
See also: land, upon

the eagle has landed

Someone or something has arrived; something been done. The phrase was famously said by US astronaut Neil Armstrong when the Eagle Lunar Lander landed on the moon in 1969. The eagle has landed—we just touched down in Texas, so we'll be seeing you soon. I tracked my package, and it said that the eagle has landed. So where the heck is it?
See also: eagle, landed
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

land a blow

 
1. Lit. to strike someone. He kept moving, and I found it almost impossible to land a blow. The boxer landed a blow to the face of his opponent.
2. Fig. to make a point. I think I really landed a blow with that remark about extortion. The point about justice landed a blow.
See also: blow, land

land at

 some place
1. [for a ship] to come to port at a place. The ship landed at the wharf and the passengers got off. We landed at the island's main city and waited for customs to clear us.
2. [for an airplane] to return to earth at an airport. We landed at O'Hare at noon. We were to land at Denver, but there was bad weather.
See also: land

land something at

some place to bring a boat, ship, or airplane to rest or to port at or near a place. The captain landed the boat at a small island in hopes of finding a place to make repairs. They had to land the plane at a small town because of a medical emergency.
See also: land

land (up)on both feet

 and land (up)on one's feet 
1. Lit. to end up on both feet after a jump, dive, etc. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) She jumped over the bicycle and landed upon both feet. Donna made the enormous leap and landed on her feet.
2. Fig. to come out of something well; to survive something satisfactorily. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) It was a rough period in his life, but when it was over he landed on both feet. At least, after it was over I landed on my feet.
See also: both, feet, land, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

land a blow

1. tv. to strike someone. He kept moving, and I found it almost impossible to land a blow.
2. tv. to make a point. I think I really landed a blow with that remark about extortion.
See also: blow, land
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Few would doubt that British policy rested on a desire to create a landed class and thus promote social and political stability And there is no question that both local and colonial elites used this policy to further their own particular interests.
One half of it, the landed part, is entrenched in federal protection and the other half, the urban part, is powerful enough to turn the federal might against the vastly outnumbered cowboy.
Brian Short, Reader in Human Geography at the University of Sussex, the requisite prelude to those two taxes was the great Valuation of 1910-1914, the first (and only) attempt since the Domesday Book of 1086 (which involved one-twentieth as many people) to describe and to assess the value of every single piece of landed property in England and Wales, urban and rural, from the largest estate to the smallest cottage.
"There is no way in our lifetime that this service will be able to compensate those owners of private property, who through no fault of their own landed in the middle of a park." These landowners are trapped, unable to use their land, build on it, or sell it, but of course they must still pay taxes on it.
Ely, "Landed Property as an Economic Concept and as a Field of Research," American Economic Review 7 (1917): 18-35.
By unleashing market forces, this would be a first step toward making the Western range the province of caring and responsible people rather than the landed empire of empowered visionaries and all-powerful bureaucracies.