landed


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land (someone) one

To punch someone very hard. When he made that comment about their mother, Pete went up and landed him one right in the eye.
See also: land, one

land a blow

1. To be successful in one's attempt to punch someone (as opposed to trying to punch and missing). The returning champion knocked his opponent out before he could land a single blow.
2. By extension, to successfully make a point that proves or supports one's argument. During the debate, she landed a number of blows by hammering on her opponent's questionable connections to offshore tax havens.
See also: blow, land

land a punch

1. To be successful in one's attempt to punch someone (as opposed to trying to punch and missing). The returning champion knocked his opponent out before he could land a single punch.
2. By extension, to successfully make a point that proves or supports one's argument. During the debate, she landed a number of punches by hammering on her opponent's questionable connections to offshore tax havens.
See also: land, punch

land in (one's) lap

To be gained or received unexpectedly or without effort. I didn't steal the internship from you—it landed in my lap, I swear! Your aunt has decided to get a new car, so her old one might land in your lap.
See also: land, lap

land in

1. To descend from the air and set down in some place or thing. The plane was forced to land in Atlanta due to a problem with its fuel tank. The wasp landed right in the bowl of pudding.
2. Of an aircraft, to perform a landing in the midst of certain weather conditions (e.g., fog, rain, snow, etc.). I don't know how you expect to land in fog as thick as this! The helicopter was forced to land in gale-force winds.
3. To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular situation, especially one that is problematic, dangerous, undesirable, etc. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. You're going to land in a whole heap of trouble if you don't start filing your taxes. I hope you realize that this investigation could land us in prison.
See also: land

land up in

To arrive at, come to, or end up in a particular situation, especially one that is problematic, undesirable, dangerous, etc. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "land" when talking about performing the action on someone else. You're going to land in a whole heap of trouble if you don't start filing your taxes. I hope you realize that this investigation could land us in prison.
See also: land, up

land up with (someone or something)

1. To be with someone, often by default. It seems that we've landed up with the most boring tour guide on the planet. He's seriously putting me to sleep. If you don't start dating more serious guys, you're going to land up with a doofus.
2. To possess something at the end or as a result of something else. We landed up with nothing because the yard sale was a bust. I landed up with a ticket to the concert because one of Nicole's friends couldn't go at the last minute.
See also: land, up

land on

1. To descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. The wasp landed on my arm, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again. His ball landed on Mrs. Thomson's rose bush, ruining dozens of the flowers.
2. To become the burden or responsibility of someone, especially very suddenly, unceremoniously, or without prior notice. It always lands on me to deal with the boss's stupid mistakes. Blame for their loss has to land on the team's coaching staff.
See also: land, on

land in on

To appear at someone's house or place of work and become a burden for them, especially suddenly or without prior notice. Sorry for landing in on you like this just before dinner! We were in the area, so we thought we would pop by for a visit. The health inspector landed in on us right when the dinner rush was about to begin.
See also: land, on

land upon

To descend from the air and set down on top of someone or something. ("Upon" is a less common, more formal alternative to "on.") The wasp landed upon my arm, so I had to stand perfectly still until it flew off again. His ball landed upon Mrs. Thomson's rose bush, ruining dozens of the flowers.
See also: land, upon

land (something)

To successfully acquire something, such as a job or piece of information. The economy is still in terrible shape—I haven't been able to land a job for months. Tom landed a really juicy story about the senator's ex-wife.
See also: land

land at

1. To come to rest or port some place in a ship or plane. Due to choppy conditions in the harbor, we had to wait for nearly four hours before we could land at shore. We ended up having to land at Minnesota 30 minutes into the flight because there was a leak in our fuel tank.
2. To bring an air or sea vessel to rest or port some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "land" and "at." I'm trying to land the boat at the pier, but the current is too strong at the moment. Ladies and gentlemen, we'll be landing the plane at Dublin airport shortly.
See also: land

land on both feet

To come through or survive a tough or uncertain situation successfully or gracefully. I wouldn't worry about Chloe—no matter what bizarre scheme she gets mixed up in, she always lands on both feet. I know you're stressed out about being laid off, but you are so skilled that I know you'll land on both feet.
See also: both, feet, land, on

land a blow

 
1. Lit. to strike someone. He kept moving, and I found it almost impossible to land a blow. The boxer landed a blow to the face of his opponent.
2. Fig. to make a point. I think I really landed a blow with that remark about extortion. The point about justice landed a blow.
See also: blow, land

land at

 some place
1. [for a ship] to come to port at a place. The ship landed at the wharf and the passengers got off. We landed at the island's main city and waited for customs to clear us.
2. [for an airplane] to return to earth at an airport. We landed at O'Hare at noon. We were to land at Denver, but there was bad weather.
See also: land

land in something

 
1. Lit. [for an airplane] to return to earth in or near a particular city. We landed in Chicago on time. They could not land in San Francisco, so they flew on to Sacramento.
2. Fig. [for someone] to end up in something, such as a mess, jail, trouble, etc. If you don't mend your ways, you're going to land in jail! Andy is going to land in hot water if he doesn't start paying his bills.
3. [for an airplane] to make a landing in something, such as bad weather, darkness, daylight, fog, etc. You can't land this plane in fog like this. The novice pilot is not capable of landing in the dark.
See also: land

land someone in something

to cause someone to end up in something. His criminal activity finally landed him in jail. You really landed yourself in a fine mess!
See also: land

land something at

some place to bring a boat, ship, or airplane to rest or to port at or near a place. The captain landed the boat at a small island in hopes of finding a place to make repairs. They had to land the plane at a small town because of a medical emergency.
See also: land

land (up)on both feet

 and land (up)on one's feet 
1. Lit. to end up on both feet after a jump, dive, etc. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) She jumped over the bicycle and landed upon both feet. Donna made the enormous leap and landed on her feet.
2. Fig. to come out of something well; to survive something satisfactorily. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) It was a rough period in his life, but when it was over he landed on both feet. At least, after it was over I landed on my feet.
See also: both, feet, land, on

land (up)on someone or something

to light on someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) A bee landed upon her and frightened her. The spoon I dropped landed on the cake and ruined the icing.
See also: land, on

land in

Also, land up. Arrive at, end in something. For example, This situation could land you in a terrible mess, or I never thought I'd land up with a reward for excellence. These expressions both employ land in the sense of "to end," a usage dating from the late 1600s.
See also: land

land on

see under jump all over; for land on one's feet, see fall on one's feet.
See also: land, on

land in

v.
1. To come down and settle in something after traveling through the air: The fly landed in my soup.
2. To arrive in some situation or condition as a result of a course of action: I landed in court after they fired me.
3. To cause someone or something to arrive in some situation or condition: The company's poor fiscal policies landed it in bankruptcy.
See also: land

land a blow

1. tv. to strike someone. He kept moving, and I found it almost impossible to land a blow.
2. tv. to make a point. I think I really landed a blow with that remark about extortion.
See also: blow, land