land-poor


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land-poor

Owning a large amount of land that is unprofitable and being without the means to maintain it or capitalize on its fertility. My fool of a husband used our savings to buy a big plot of land out west, and we've been land-poor for the last 10 years as a result.
References in periodicals archive ?
Access of Land-poor Households to Irrigation and Modern Rices
Fortunately in Bangladesh, NGOs have been playing an effective role in providing credit support to land-poor households.
With its vast agricultural potential, but limited financial resources, Pakistan could be the perfect partner for the cash-rich and land-poor UAE.
It postulated that proto-industry developed in rural areas where at least a portion of the population was so land-poor that it would move easily into low-paying cottage production in order to survive, in other words, that it was the poorer classes who became the rural weavers.
But throughout the process not only land-poor smallholders and cottagers but also owners of self-sufficient farms went into weaving.
LAX is one of the most constrained, land-poor airports in the United States,'' said Assistant General Manager Jerald Lee in a report to the commission.
Results show that the welfare cost of production risk is significant, it is higher for land-poor households, and its significant part is attributable to green fodder price risk.
9 percent of the initial expected income in the case of the reference group and it is higher for land-poor households.
Moreover, factofarms could allow drought-stricken or land-poor nations to produce a dependable supply of food.
The Greens of Las Vegas planned to ultimately develop six, 18-hole natural grass putting courses on approximately 23 acres one mile from the southern part of the Las Vegas Strip and expand its business plan to other high-density tourist cities and land-poor countries.
Raising producer prices, for instance, may help the land-poor but worsen the situation of the landless.
It is sometimes assumed that land-poor rural people make only a marginal contribution to production and that when compared to large producers who are ordinarily favoured with more than their share of good land, technology, market facilities, and credit, small farmers are insignificant contributors to overall growth.