lamp


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Related to lamp: WAMP

smell of the lamp

To show the signs of arduous, overwrought effort, and to lack freshness or vitality as a result. (Said especially of academic or literary work.) His thesis is meticulously crafted, but the paragraphs are so dry and calculated, and the paper lacks any flourish or style. As a whole, it rather smells of the lamp to me.
See also: lamp, of, smell

the smell of the lamp

Signs of arduous, overwrought effort, with an absence of freshness or vitality as a result. (Said especially of academic or literary work.) His thesis is meticulously crafted, but the paragraphs are so dry and calculated, and the paper lacks any flourish or style. As a whole, it has the smell of the lamp about it.
See also: lamp, of, smell

an Aladdin's lamp

A magical object that allows its owner to make wishes and have them granted. (In The Arabian Nights, Aladdin finds a magic lamp in a cave.) The kids think that old ring they found in the attic is an Aladdin's lamp, but it's really just a piece of junk.
See also: lamp

lamps

dated slang One's eyes. It seemed like the fire went out of his lamps months ago—I hope everything's all right. The poor girl was so tired she could barely keep her lamps open.
See also: lamp

an Aladdin's lamp

a talisman that enables its owner to fulfil every desire.
In the Arabian Nights tale of Aladdin, the hero finds a magic lamp in a cave. He discovers that rubbing it summons a powerful genie who is able to carry out all his wishes.
See also: lamp

smell of the lamp

show signs of laborious study and effort.
The lamp here is an oil lamp, formerly used for night-time work or study.
See also: lamp, of, smell

lamp

tv. to look at someone or something. (The “lamps” are the eyes.) Here, lamp this tire for a minute. It’s low isn’t it?

lamps

n. the eyes. (Crude.) His lamps are closed. He’s asleep or dead.
See also: lamp
References in classic literature ?
Aladdin bade her keep her cotton, for he would sell the lamp instead.
So they sat at breakfast till it was dinner-time, and Aladdin told his mother about the lamp. She begged him to sell it, and have nothing to do with devils.
I saw the ceiling-cloth nearly in the centre of the room bag with a shape that was pressing it downward and downward toward the lighted lamps on the table.
Occasionally, the smoke came rolling down the chimney as though it could not bear to go out into such a night; and when I set the doors open and looked down the staircase, the staircase lamps were blown out; and when I shaded my face with my hands and looked through the black windows (opening them ever so little, was out of the question in the teeth of such wind and rain) I saw that the lamps in the court were blown out, and that the lamps on the bridges and the shore were shuddering, and that the coal fires in barges on the river were being carried away before the wind like red-hot splashes in the rain.
"You deserve to be broken on the wheel for the words that you have just made use of," said the giant, as he extinguished the lamp his companion handed to him; "but the king is too kind-hearted."
Aramis seized hold of it, coolly tore it in four pieces, held them to the lamp, and burnt them.
Sometimes it sounded as though a blind puppy were squeaking above the lamp; then as if a stone were being ground on hard ice; and again, like muffled blows on a drum; but all dragged out and made small, as though they travelled through a little horn a weary distance away.
The Thing had disappeared, and Kotuko was talking excitedly about his power over spirits as he crouched round the lamp. In the middle of his wild sayings the girl began to laugh, and rock herself backward and forward.
"/See!/" he repeated hoarsely, holding the lamp over the open chest.
By now we are running down the passage, and this is what the light from the lamp shows us.
This concentration of the footman upon his lamps, and his indifference to what was passing in Levin, at first astounded him, but immediately on considering the question he realized that no one knew or was bound to know his feelings, and that it was all the more necessary to act calmly, sensibly, and resolutely to get through this wall of indifference and attain his aim.
Coming to the workshop, she saw the lamp burning on the forge, and everything as Sim had left it.
Then she could make out that he tried his key--that he was blowing into it-- that he knocked it on the nearest post to beat the dust out--that he took it under a lamp to look at it--that he poked bits of stick into the lock to clear it--that he peeped into the keyhole, first with one eye, and then with the other--that he tried the key again-- that he couldn't turn it, and what was worse, couldn't get it out-- that he bent it--that then it was much less disposed to come out than before--that he gave it a mighty twist and a great pull, and then it came out so suddenly that he staggered backwards--that he kicked the door--that he shook it--finally, that he smote his forehead, and sat down on the step in despair.
There they lay in their triangular oaken vaults, each mariner a chiselled muteness; a score of lamps flashing upon his hooded eyes.
The hilltop, the cool air of the night, the company of the great monuments, the sight of the city under his feet, with its hills and valleys and crossing files of lamps, drew him by all he had of the poetic, and he turned that way; and by that quite innocent deflection, ripened the crop of his venial errors for the sickle of destiny.