lame

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Related to laming: lambing, Lamingtons

lame joke

A joke that is deemed (often by the listener) to be corny or otherwise not amusing. A: "Come on, isn't that funny?" B: "It's kind of a lame joke, mom." My date clearly thinks he's hilarious, but all I heard was a bunch of lame jokes.
See also: joke, lame

lame duck

1. Someone or something that needs help. The company started as a lame duck that was saved by an innovative entrepreneur who decided to take some risks and go in a new direction.
2. An elected official serving their last term in office, usually so-called after a successor has been elected. The opposing party was angry at the president's intention to name a Supreme Court replacement while he was a lame duck.
See also: duck, lame

help a lame dog over a stile

obsolete To help or assist someone in need in some fundamental or basic way. He has so much money that it would be no effort at all for him to help a lame dog over a stile, but the man is adamant that not a penny of his fortune be used towards charity of any kind.
See also: dog, help, lame, over

lame duck

 
1. Fig. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office and cannot run for reelection. You can't expect much from a lame duck. As a lame duck, there's not a lot I can do.
2. Fig. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. (Used as an adjective; sometimes lame-duck.) You don't expect much from a lame-duck president. Lame-duck Congresses tend to do things they wouldn't dare do otherwise.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

An elected officeholder whose term of office has not yet expired but who has failed to be re-elected and therefore cannot garner much political support for initiatives. For example, You can't expect a lame duck President to get much accomplished; he's only got a month left in office . This expression originated in the 1700s and then meant a stockbroker who did not meet his debts. It was transferred to officeholders in the 1860s. The Lame Duck Amendment, 20th to the U.S. Constitution, calls for Congress and each new President to take office in January instead of March (as before), thereby eliminating the lame-duck session of Congress.
See also: duck, lame

a lame duck

COMMON
1. If a politician or a government is a lame duck, they have little real power, for example because their period of office is coming to an end. The government is headed by a president who looks like a lame duck. The last thing people needed was to feel that the government was a lame duck. Note: You can also use lame-duck before a noun. He's already seen widely as a lame-duck Prime Minister. He would have found himself leading a lame-duck administration to near-certain defeat.
2. If someone or something is a lame duck, they are in a very weak position and in need of support. The company has completed its transformation from the lame duck of the motor industry into a quality car maker. Moira considers all single people lame ducks. Note: You can also use lame-duck before a noun. It is not right to use taxpayers' money to support lame-duck industries. Note: This expression is usually used to criticize someone or something. Note: The image here is of a duck that has been shot and wounded, and so cannot move properly and is likely to die.
See also: duck, lame

help a lame dog over a stile

come to the aid of a person in need.
See also: dog, help, lame, over

lame duck

a person or thing that is powerless or in need of help. informal
In the mid 18th century, lame duck was used in a stock-market context, with reference to a person or company that could not fulfil their financial obligations. Later, from the mid 19th century, it was used specifically with reference to US politicians in the final period of office, after the election of their successor.
1998 Spectator At some point in his second and final term, every president becomes a lame duck: as the man himself matters less, so does the office.
See also: duck, lame

a ˌlame ˈduck

(informal) a person or an organization that is not very successful and needs help: My uncle is a bit of a lame duck. The family has to help him all the time.The shipping industry had become a lame duck.
See also: duck, lame

lame

and laine and lane
1. mod. inept; inadequate; undesirable. That guy’s so lame, it’s pitiful.
2. n. a square person. (Streets. Underworld.) Let’s see if that lame over there has anything we want in his pockets.
3. n. an inept person. The guy turned out to be a lame, and we had to fire him.

lame duck

1. n. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office. You can’t expect much from a lame duck.
2. mod. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. You don’t expect much from a lame duck president.
See also: duck, lame

lamebrain

and lame-brain
1. n. a fool. Please don’t call me a lamebrain. I do my best.
2. and lamebrained mod. foolish. No more of your lamebrained ideas!

lame-brain

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Laming mad other astronomers conjecture that the core was kicked off center because the explosion wasn't equally strong in all directions.
Lord Laming said there was concern that quality social work was being put in danger by an "overemphasis on process and targets", singling out computer systems which were "hampering progress".
Lord Laming said contributors to the report had agreed on the worth of the reforms introduced after the Climbie inquiry.
Ms Laming says companies should be concerned about unlawful copying, and advises that the first step is to have a clear policy on what is and what is not permitted, and to encourage employees to report any instances of what appear to be copying infringement to a designated person in the company.
This aggressive approach of reporting to an external body, which has been used in other fields, does not promote respect for intellectual property rights, and is more likely to breed resentment, acrimony and mistrust," Ms Laming added.
Lord Laming said: "These families are homeless because of poverty, domestic violence and mental health problems.
10pm Mrs Laming phoned the city council's education and transport department but was told the school minibus may have been stuck in traffic.
Mrs Laming contacted friends who lived there, but despite an extensive search, Josh was nowhere to be seen.
Lord Laming did not say that staff at the centre were too busy organising a party to look into abuse.
Lord Laming was expected to make sweeping recommendations to social services following his 15-month inquiry, the biggest yet held into the death of a child.
Inquiry chairman Lord Laming said Carole Baptiste has ``exhausted his patience'' after she yesterday ignored a summons -- the latest in a long line of attempts to get her to appear.
Edward Armstrong, a social services manager at the London council who is currently suspended, made the accusations which prompted inquiry chairman Lord Laming to order the investigation.
Lord Laming, who was appointed to head the initial inquiry into serial killer GP Harold Shipman, is standing down to meet other work commitments.
The 28,559 tonne Pride of Provence was arriving from Calais when it was in contact with the breakwater as it entered the harbour at Dover,company spokesman Chris Laming said.
Lord Laming, aged 63, was Chief Inspector of the Social Services Inspectorate between 1991 and 1998, overseeing inquiries into high-profile scandals involving sex-abuse of children in care and mistreatment of residents of old people's homes.