lame duck

(redirected from lame-duck)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to lame-duck: Lame-Duck Amendment

lame duck

1. Someone or something that needs help. The company started as a lame duck that was saved by an innovative entrepreneur who decided to take some risks and go in a new direction.
2. An elected official serving their last term in office, usually so-called after a successor has been elected. The opposing party was angry at the president's intention to name a Supreme Court replacement while he was a lame duck.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

 
1. Fig. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office and cannot run for reelection. You can't expect much from a lame duck. As a lame duck, there's not a lot I can do.
2. Fig. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. (Used as an adjective; sometimes lame-duck.) You don't expect much from a lame-duck president. Lame-duck Congresses tend to do things they wouldn't dare do otherwise.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

An elected officeholder whose term of office has not yet expired but who has failed to be re-elected and therefore cannot garner much political support for initiatives. For example, You can't expect a lame duck President to get much accomplished; he's only got a month left in office . This expression originated in the 1700s and then meant a stockbroker who did not meet his debts. It was transferred to officeholders in the 1860s. The Lame Duck Amendment, 20th to the U.S. Constitution, calls for Congress and each new President to take office in January instead of March (as before), thereby eliminating the lame-duck session of Congress.
See also: duck, lame

a lame duck

COMMON
1. If a politician or a government is a lame duck, they have little real power, for example because their period of office is coming to an end. The government is headed by a president who looks like a lame duck. The last thing people needed was to feel that the government was a lame duck. Note: You can also use lame-duck before a noun. He's already seen widely as a lame-duck Prime Minister. He would have found himself leading a lame-duck administration to near-certain defeat.
2. If someone or something is a lame duck, they are in a very weak position and in need of support. The company has completed its transformation from the lame duck of the motor industry into a quality car maker. Moira considers all single people lame ducks. Note: You can also use lame-duck before a noun. It is not right to use taxpayers' money to support lame-duck industries. Note: This expression is usually used to criticize someone or something. Note: The image here is of a duck that has been shot and wounded, and so cannot move properly and is likely to die.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

a person or thing that is powerless or in need of help. informal
In the mid 18th century, lame duck was used in a stock-market context, with reference to a person or company that could not fulfil their financial obligations. Later, from the mid 19th century, it was used specifically with reference to US politicians in the final period of office, after the election of their successor.
1998 Spectator At some point in his second and final term, every president becomes a lame duck: as the man himself matters less, so does the office.
See also: duck, lame

a ˌlame ˈduck

(informal) a person or an organization that is not very successful and needs help: My uncle is a bit of a lame duck. The family has to help him all the time.The shipping industry had become a lame duck.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

1. n. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office. You can’t expect much from a lame duck.
2. mod. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. You don’t expect much from a lame duck president.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck, a

A person finishing a term of office, employment, or other engagement, and soon to be supplanted by another. This term had quite another meaning in eighteenth-century Britain. Then it denoted a stock-exchange jobber (broker) who could not pay his debts and therefore was struck from the members’ list, forced to “waddle away” from the Exchange. In the nineteenth century, however, the term began to be used for any ineffectual person, on both sides of the Atlantic. Some decades thereafter it began to be used in its present meaning in the United States, that is, for government officials who have failed to be reelected but must serve out their term of office, even though their endeavors are hampered because they are about to be replaced.
See also: lame
References in periodicals archive ?
Former House historian Ray Smock says canceling the lame-duck session would be unprecedented but not illegal.
(36) This problem is especially acute during caretaker and lame-duck periods.
The lame-duck session is a time to try to complete action on long-stalled bills.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) also promised during his reelection bid that he would bring up during the lame-duck session legislation to give a cost of living (COLA) increase to Social Security beneficiaries, a bill creating a pathway to citizenship for certain illegal immigrants, and legislation having to do with collective bargaining for firefighters and police officers.
She has cited a variety of reasons for quitting Eoe1/4" the burden of fighting nearly two dozen ethics charges, which she has dismissed as "frivolous"; her desire to avoid being perceived as a powerless "lame-duck" governor; and a "higher calling," among others.
PRINCETON, NJ -- As the 110th Congress returns for its final lame-duck session Monday, new Gallup polling shows that only 19% of Americans approve of the job Congress is doing, while about three-quarters disapprove.
Alexis' lame-duck cabinet has continued to deal with current affairs while a new government is being formed but political infighting in parliament has dragged out the transition process.
In other words, there are benefits to Bush's lame-duck status, but there are also limits.
None of them is to gain much in dealing with a lame-duck US president like Bush, who only has months left in the White House.
FORMULA One supremo Bernie Ecclestone fears Max Mosley may become a 'lame-duck' president of the FIA if he continues to face growing opposition to his leadership.
officials have noticed that there is a "quiet arrogance" emerging on the part of the Chinese that they need not concede anything on the currency front to the lame-duck Bush Administration.
One, observable in the last year of any administration, is a phenomenon that has earned the somewhat harsh name of "lame-duck guts." As the fear of being fired diminishes for the political appointee who is already preparing to leave, he becomes more willing to speak out about what's wrong.
He is a lame-duck president and - apart from ensuring British lives are not needlessly lost in an unjust and unwinnable war - we should be seeking to build bridges with the moderate politicians who will be in the running to replace him in the next American election.
Leading up to the 2006 federal elections, and in the lame-duck session following, the LWVUS Advocacy staff continued to implement and defend the Democracy Agenda, along with other priorities for the 109th Congress set by the LWVUS Board.
The committee also urged Congressional leaders to complete work on the package of expiring tax provisions during the lame-duck session.