laissez-faire


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laissez-faire

1. The doctrine that the government should not be involved with nor controlling of businesses. The new president has vowed to take a position of laissez-faire to undo the overregulation of businesses practiced by the previous administration.
2. A stance or desire that one will not control or be involved with the actions of other people. It seems to be in vogue recently for parents to be laissez-faire with their children, allowing them total freedom without structure or discipline.
References in periodicals archive ?
While investigating the role of transformational leadership in public sector organizations, Wright and Pandey (2009) found that transformational leadership is present in public sector organizations at higher level than transactional and laissez-faire leadership styles.
a]: There is a relationship between laissez-faire leadership style and organizational profitability.
The descriptive analysis based on employees' experience indicates that the less experienced employees have high mean on transformational leadership and the high experienced employees have high mean score on laissez-faire leadership style (Table 4).
THE LAISSEZ-FAIRE boss keeps their distance, they are often away from the office and keep communication to the minimum.
In the after-dinner conversation over coffee, after having insisted that laissez-faire policies are the best everywhere at all times, Friedman was asked what, in a free-market society, poor blacks in Mississippi suffering economic discrimination ought to do.
But unlike the laissez-faire Austrians, Ropke conceded that capitalism can be disruptive and inhumane, and that its vaunted efficiency and affluence can exact social and spiritual forfeits.
The Revival of Laissez-Faire in American Macroeconomic Theory.
Mill's laissez-faire Marketplace of Truth, where everyone is free to peddle his or her faith, theory, or ideology; and may the best product prevail--for the time being, until something better evolves.
We cannot afford laissez-faire attitudes when it comes to dealing with drug problems.
The laissez-faire attitude towards natural rubber by the major rubber consumers is not only an embarrassment, it's to the detriment of the whole industry.
But moralists and mercantalists in Washington and Bogota lost patience with laissez-faire.
In the early 1970s, when even Milton Friedman proclaimed that "we are all Keynesians now," one would scarcely have anticipated that laissez-faire principles would soon dominate public debate.
Dommel, formerly France's Chief Inspector of Finance, attacked the laissez-faire approach to corruption which regarded it as a necessary fact of economic life in certain cultures.
When researching these two active forms of leadership, they are often contrasted with extremely passive laissez-faire leadership (see, for example, Yammarino & Bass, 1990; Yammarino, Spangler & Bass, 1993).
La intensificacion sin freno del capitalismo laissez-faire y el avance de los valores de mercado en todas las areas de la vida esta haciendo peligrar a nuestra sociedad abierta y democratica.