lie with (one)

(redirected from laid with)

lie with (one)

1. Literally, to recline alongside one. He lay with me on the rug while we listened to music.
2. To be decided by one; to depend on or rest with one; to be up to one. You know where we stand, but the decision ultimately lies with you. I'd feel better about this if the success of the whole thing didn't lie with someone we don't know.
3. euphemism, old-fashioned To have sexual intercourse with one. He giggled when I asked if he wanted to lie with me. I guess it's not something most college students would say.
See also: lie
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lie with someone

 
1. to recline with someone. Come and lie with me and we will keep warm. Jimmy and Franny were lying with each other to keep warm.
2. Euph. to recline with someone and have sex. She claimed he asked her to lie with him. Do you mean to imply that she lay with him?
See also: lie
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lie with

Be decided by, dependent on, or up to. For example, The choice of restaurant lies with you. Starting about 1300 this phrase meant "to have sexual intercourse with," a usage that is now obsolete. [Late 1800s]
See also: lie
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lie with

v.
1. To be decided by, dependent on, or up to someone or something: Most of the country's wealth still lies with the elite. The fault lies with the negligent parents, not with the children. The prisoner's fate now lies with the governor.
2. Archaic To have sexual intercourse with someone.
See also: lie
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Because, as is stated above, he who has not first laid his foundations may be able with great ability to lay them afterwards, but they will be laid with trouble to the architect and danger to the building.