lace

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Related to lacer: laser
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lace (something) with (something)

1. To mix some substance, typically alcohol or drugs of some kind, into another, especially without the knowledge of other people. Often used in passive constructions. You're going to lace the punch with booze? Do you know how childish and cliché that is? When she woke up the next morning, her friend told her that her drink had been laced with kind of blackout drug, and they had all carried her home in a taxi to make sure she was safe.
2. To adulterate something, such as the truth, with something unnecessary or corrupting. Often used in passive constructions. The state-sponsored news network always laces stories with pro-government propaganda. I know you have this idea in your head about what happened, but remember that our memories are laced with all kinds of mistakes and fabrications.
See also: lace

lace into

1. To tighten and tie up the laces of some clothing or equipment one or someone else is wearing. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "lace" when talking about someone else. He laced into his boots and skated out onto the ice. Could you lace me into this dress? It's too tight to do it myself.
2. To verbally attack, berate, or upbraid someone. You need to stop lacing into the kids during practice like that, Tom. They're just doing soccer for fun. The president laced into the reporter for asking what he called a disrespectful question.
See also: lace

lace up

To tighten and tie up the laces of some clothing or equipment one or someone else is wearing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used after "lace" when talking about someone else. He laced up boots and skated out onto the ice. Gosh this dress is tight. Could you lace me up? Make sure you've laced your shoulder pads up before heading out onto the field.
See also: lace, up

laced mutton

obsolete slang A prostitute. A: "I think that Lord Stewart is spending time with a laced mutton." B: "No, surely not!"
See also: lace, mutton

laced-up

Uptight; repressed. She may seem laced-up at the office, but she's actually a lot of fun. She's always up for dancing the night away at a club. A: "No thanks, I'd rather study than go to a party." B: "Oh, don't be so laced-up—live a little!"
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lace into someone or something

 and light into someone or something
Fig. to attack, devour, or scold someone or something. We laced into a big meal of pork and beans. The bully punched John once, and then John really laced into him. John lit into him with both fists.
See also: lace

lace someone into something

to tighten the laces of something someone is wearing. Sally helped Billy lace himself into his boots. The maid laced Gloria into her corset.
See also: lace

lace someone up

to tie someone's laces; to help someone get dressed in a garment having laces. Would you please lace me up? I can't reach the ties in the back. I laced up Sally, as she requested.
See also: lace, up

lace something up

to tie the laces of something. Lace your shoes up, Tommy. Lace up your shoes.
See also: lace, up

lace something with something

to adulterate something with something, often with something alcoholic. Someone laced the punch with strong whiskey. Who laced my coffee with brandy?
See also: lace
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lace into

Also, light into. Attack, assail, as in He laced into me for arriving late, or She lit into him for forgetting the tickets. The first of these colloquial terms employs lace in the sense of "beat up or thrash," a usage dating from the late 1500s. The idiom with light dates from the late 1800s and stems from the verb meaning "descend."
See also: lace
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lace into

v.
To attack or assail someone: The captain laced into me for getting to practice so late.
See also: lace

lace up

v.
1. To fasten shoes or clothing by tightening and tying laces: I laced up my skates before my lesson. We laced our hiking boots up before we headed out.
2. To tighten and tie the laces on someone's shoes or clothing: Come over here so I can lace you up. The assistant laced up the skater before the start of the competition.
See also: lace, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lace

1. tv. to add alcohol to coffee or tea; to add alcohol to any food or drink. Who laced the punch?
2. tv. to add a bit of one drug to another; to add drugs to any food or drink. (Drugs.) Somebody laced the ice cubes with acid.
3. n. money. (Underworld.) You got any lace in those pockets?
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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