lace


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laced mutton

obsolete slang A prostitute. A: "I think that Lord Stewart is spending time with a laced mutton." B: "No, surely not!"
See also: lace, mutton

lace into

1. To tighten and tie up the laces of some clothing or equipment one or someone else is wearing. In this usage, a name or pronoun can be used after "lace" when talking about someone else. He laced into his boots and skated out onto the ice. Could you lace me into this dress? It's too tight to do it myself.
2. To verbally attack, berate, or upbraid someone. You need to stop lacing into the kids during practice like that, Tom. They're just doing soccer for fun. The president laced into the reporter for asking what he called a disrespectful question.
See also: lace

lace up

To tighten and tie up the laces of some clothing or equipment one or someone else is wearing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used after "lace" when talking about someone else. He laced up boots and skated out onto the ice. Gosh this dress is tight. Could you lace me up? Make sure you've laced your shoulder pads up before heading out onto the field.
See also: lace, up

lace (something) with (something)

1. To mix some substance, typically alcohol or drugs of some kind, into another, especially without the knowledge of other people. Often used in passive constructions. You're going to lace the punch with booze? Do you know how childish and cliché that is? When she woke up the next morning, her friend told her that her drink had been laced with kind of blackout drug, and they had all carried her home in a taxi to make sure she was safe.
2. To adulterate something, such as the truth, with something unnecessary or corrupting. Often used in passive constructions. The state-sponsored news network always laces stories with pro-government propaganda. I know you have this idea in your head about what happened, but remember that our memories are laced with all kinds of mistakes and fabrications.
See also: lace

lace into someone or something

 and light into someone or something
Fig. to attack, devour, or scold someone or something. We laced into a big meal of pork and beans. The bully punched John once, and then John really laced into him. John lit into him with both fists.
See also: lace

lace someone into something

to tighten the laces of something someone is wearing. Sally helped Billy lace himself into his boots. The maid laced Gloria into her corset.
See also: lace

lace someone up

to tie someone's laces; to help someone get dressed in a garment having laces. Would you please lace me up? I can't reach the ties in the back. I laced up Sally, as she requested.
See also: lace, up

lace something up

to tie the laces of something. Lace your shoes up, Tommy. Lace up your shoes.
See also: lace, up

lace something with something

to adulterate something with something, often with something alcoholic. Someone laced the punch with strong whiskey. Who laced my coffee with brandy?
See also: lace

lace into

Also, light into. Attack, assail, as in He laced into me for arriving late, or She lit into him for forgetting the tickets. The first of these colloquial terms employs lace in the sense of "beat up or thrash," a usage dating from the late 1500s. The idiom with light dates from the late 1800s and stems from the verb meaning "descend."
See also: lace

lace into

v.
To attack or assail someone: The captain laced into me for getting to practice so late.
See also: lace

lace up

v.
1. To fasten shoes or clothing by tightening and tying laces: I laced up my skates before my lesson. We laced our hiking boots up before we headed out.
2. To tighten and tie the laces on someone's shoes or clothing: Come over here so I can lace you up. The assistant laced up the skater before the start of the competition.
See also: lace, up

lace

1. tv. to add alcohol to coffee or tea; to add alcohol to any food or drink. Who laced the punch?
2. tv. to add a bit of one drug to another; to add drugs to any food or drink. (Drugs.) Somebody laced the ice cubes with acid.
3. n. money. (Underworld.) You got any lace in those pockets?
References in periodicals archive ?
This will prevent stabilizer slippage during embroidery, which could cause the lace to gap or fall apart in areas.
Hollywood Lace uses a proprietary method to improve hair replacement and to make sure knots are invisible.
The lacemaking workshop Venice and Athienian lace takes place in the framework of the celebrations of the 10 years of operation of the museum.
Yeke, LACE's projects include Legislative Support project and the President Special Project (PSC) along with additional projects that are implemented for the World Bank.
"It is hard to say how many men make bobbin lace. I know about 12 in Slovakia but I am sure there are more," said Matej Pisca as quoted by the TASR newswire.
Her long-sleeved lace dress designed by Sarah Burton received raves for its simplicity and grandeur.
Cut the pattern pieces out and cut along the drawn lace insert lines.
Jessica is faultless in an ankle-grazing lace dress with a suede biker jacket.
Staff from the museum will be there to explain the importance of lace and its history and curator, Gwynedd Roberts, will present a free lecture on the museum collection and the items in the exhibition during the course of the four-day fair which runs from April 7-10.
It is of course lace. And this year the seasonal favourite is more popular than ever.
Lace One-Skein Wonders gathers contributions from lace workers around the world and provides a collection of over a hundred lace projects, each using just one skein of yarn.
In the evening, the sisters ask the lace-makers to show how they incorporated the theme into their lace. After a discussion, the cycle starts again with a new theme for the next day.
In 2011, I began research that would culminate in "(Re-)Making Irish Lace," an exhibition that ran at the Castellani Art Museum of Niagara University (CAM) from July 15-December 2, 2012.