labour


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Related to labour: giving birth, Labour law, labour pains

labor under the illusion of/that

To live, operate, or function with the unyielding belief in something, especially that which is fanciful, unrealistic, or untrue. Primarily heard in US. Jeremy's always labored under the illusion of being a great writer, even though he's never written more than a few crummy poems. No one likes paying taxes, but those who would call for them to be done away with altogether are laboring under the illusion that our society can function without them!
See also: illusion, labor, of, that

labor under the delusion of/that

To live, operate, or function with the unyielding belief in something, especially that which is fanciful, unrealistic, or untrue. Primarily heard in US. Jeremy's always labored under the delusion of being a great writer, even though he's never written more than a few crummy poems. No one likes paying taxes, but those who would call for them to be done away with altogether are laboring under the delusion that our society can function without them!
See also: delusion, labor, of, that

stoop labour

Hard, physical labour requiring one to bend over, especially that which would be done on a farm. Primarily heard in UK. My grandfather has a permanent hunch in his spine from the stoop labour he had to do throughout his life. Every summer, we send the children to my brother's farm. It's good for them to get out of the city for a while and do a little bit of stoop labour.
See also: labour, stoop

labor of love

Work that is done for pleasure rather than money. Katherine spends all of her free time knitting baby clothes for her friends. It must be a labor of love.
See also: labor, love, of

labor the point

To talk about or emphasize something excessively and perhaps repetitively, usually to the extent that the listener becomes bored or annoyed. A: "I don't mean to labor the point, but I'm just worried that there won't be enough food at the party." B: "Yeah, we know, you've said that 10 times now." I'm only laboring the point because we still haven't reached a decision.
See also: labor, point

labor of Hercules

A job, task, or activity that requires a huge amount of effort, energy, or physical strength. Sometimes used ironically or hyperbolically. But getting enough votes to pass the controversial legislation may prove to be a labor of Hercules. Sometimes it feels like finding a good burger that isn't the price of a sirloin steak is a labor of Hercules. It will be a labor of Hercules for them to dethrone the former champions in this year's Super Bowl, but they certainly have a shot.
See also: Hercules, labor, of

labor at (something)

To work very hard or diligently to accomplish something. I've been laboring at my Ph.D. for nearly four years now. Pat's out back laboring at repainting the back wall.
See also: labor

labor away (at something)

To work very hard or diligently (to accomplish something). I've been laboring away at my Ph.D. for nearly four years now. Pat always spends his Saturdays laboring away in the back garden.
See also: away, labor

labor of love

Fig. a task that is either unpaid or badly paid and that one does simply for one's own satisfaction or pleasure or to please someone whom one likes or loves. Jane made no money out of the biography she wrote. She was writing about the life of a friend and the book was a labor of love. Mary hates knitting, but she made a sweater for her boyfriend. What a labor of love.
See also: labor, love, of

labor of love

Work done for one's satisfaction rather than monetary reward. For example, The research took three years but it was a labor of love. This expression appears twice in the New Testament (Hebrews 6:10, Thessalonians 1:3), referring to those who do God's work as a labor of love. [c. 1600]
See also: labor, love, of

a labour of love

COMMON A labour of love is a task that you do because you enjoy it or feel strongly that it is worth doing. Note: `Labour' is spelled `labor' in American English. There is no doubt that his debut novel is a labour of love, and obviously very close to his heart. They concentrated on restoring buildings such as the Victorian greenhouse, an expensive labour of love. Note: This appears in the Bible in 1 Thessalonians 1:3, `Remembering without ceasing your work of faith, and labour of love, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ'.
See also: labour, love, of

labour the point

If someone labours the point, they keep explaining something or emphasizing a fact even though people have already understood it. I don't want to labour the point but there it is. The truth, without labouring the point, is that one can lead a good and fulfilling life without children.
See also: labour, point

a labour of Hercules

a task requiring enormous strength or effort.
In Greek mythology, Hercules was a man of superhuman strength and courage who performed twelve immense tasks or labours imposed on him as a penance for killing his children in a fit of madness. After his death he was ranked among the gods.
See also: Hercules, labour, of

a labour of love

a task done for the love of a person or for the work itself.
See also: labour, love, of

labour the point

explain or discuss something at excessive or unnecessary length.
See also: labour, point

a ˌlabour of ˈlove

a hard task that you do because you want to, not because it is necessary: This tablecloth is a real labour of love. It took her years to make it.
See also: labour, love, of

labour the ˈpoint

continue to repeat or explain something that is already clear: I think you’ve said enough — there’s no need to labour the point.
See also: labour, point

labor of Hercules

A very difficult task. When the Greek hero Hercules was driven mad because of the goddess Hera's jealousy, he murdered his children. As atonement for his crime, he was obliged to perform twelve demanding tasks, such as slaying or capturing dangerous beasts, obtaining various prized and well-guarded possessions, and cleaning a very dirty stable in just one day. Hercules succeeded and was granted immortality and the hand of the now-mollified Hera's daughter. If your boss gives you an impossible assignment, especially that must be completed in a short time, you could show off your classical education by referring to it as a labor of Hercules.
See also: Hercules, labor, of
References in periodicals archive ?
The Canadian Labour Congress is the head office of the trade union movement in Canada.
But this is the state Canada is in today where a Labour politburo gets away with the big lie of saying all its members support the invented nonsense called "same-sex marriage.
The longstanding contribution of Canadian unions to this struggle is discussed and applauded in the most recent issue of Labour Notes by writer Alan Sears, who describes himself as "a gay activist and a proudly unionized professor at Ryerson University in Toronto.
Then there's the chancellor's latest budget, brazenly geared toward the Old Left in what Blairites view as an effort to curry favor among rank-and-file Labour Members of Parliament.
Labour MPs on both sides of the debate agree that the tests are nothing more than political cover.
Newly minted Prime Minister Tony Blair, the Oxford-educated lawyer who took the helm of Labour in 1994, has dragged the party of R.
During the past three years, Blair and a circle of politically savvy aides -- many of whom proudly proclaim that they have borrowed pages from Clinton's playbook -- have "modernized" the Labour Party by undermining its ties to the trade unions that created it.
The BC Federation of Labour (BCFL) is also on record as soliciting funds for abortion clinics.
The Ontario Coalition for Abortion Clinics (OCAC) has also infiltrated the labour movement; it is stated in the book Social Movements, Social Change, The Politics and Practice of Organizing (funded by our tax dollars) that, "at various labour conventions in 1982 and 1983, OCAC activists were involved in garnering support for choice.
In his Christianity and the Labour Question (first published in English in 1864), Ketteler expressed the opinion that
However, it is possible that his stand did not go unnoticed by various labour organizations.
Still, Berger qualifies the apparent temporal disparity, dating Labour's origin to the foundation of the Social Democratic Federation (1883) and the Independent Labour Party (1893), while the flowering of the S.
remained alienated from a repressive and hostile state and recalcitrant employers, while Labour was easily integrated, to the detriment of its radicalism.
Hers is an anthropologically-informed history of labour that makes creative use of sources beyond the traditional: the newspaper and archival records yield up their riches alongside gleanings from phrase books published for white settlers to the Colony, or an early Zulu-English dictionary.
At the centre of Atkins' analysis lies the "kaffir labour question" about which white settlers crowed incessantly in the nineteenth century.