label (someone, something, or oneself) as (something)

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label (someone, something, or oneself) as (something)

To assign a particular descriptive category or characterization to someone, something, or oneself. Often used in passive constructions. I wouldn't label myself as a perfectionist by any means, but I do like to make sure I do a job right. He has been labeled as a traitor by the government after releasing classified military documents to the public. It's easy to label flashy cars like that as needless emblems of affluence, but once you get behind the wheel of one, you'll realize how wonderful they actually are to drive.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

label someone or something as something

to designate someone or something as something. She labeled him as an uncouth person. We labeled the committee as a worthless organization.
See also: label
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
One whole shelf was marked: "Brain Furniture," and the bottles on this shelf were labeled as follows: "Obedience," "Cleverness," "Judgment," "Courage," "Ingenuity," "Amiability," "Learning," "Truth," "Poesy," "Self Reliance."
The FDA recommends that products indicating "whole grain" or "whole wheat" are labeled as such when they contain whole grains or whole wheat flour and no refined versions of these ingredients.
"International trade law allows a product that is `significantly transformed' to be labeled as a domestic product," explains Chuck Lambert, chief economist for the National Cattlemen's Beef Association.
"If you are not able to find products that are clearly labeled as not using rBGH, contact your local dairy producers and urge them to make them available" Rapaport suggests.
In states where milk products labeled as rBGH-free aren't available, consumers concerned about such hormones should consider organic milk products.
As stated by the USDA, the OFPA and The National Organic Program (which is a marketing branch of the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service), agricultural products labeled as `organic' are required to have originated from farms or handling operations certified by a state or private agency that has been accredited by the USDA.