label (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

(redirected from label themselves with)

label (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

1. To imprint, inscribe, or attach an identifying or descriptive symbol, word, or name on someone or something. Be sure to label any food you keep in the staff fridge with your name so no one else accidentally eats it.
2. To refer to or identify someone or something with a term intended to designate or categorize them or it in some way, especially a negative one. They labeled him with all manner of slurs because of his stance on the issue.
3. To use a particular implement to imprint or inscribe an identifying symbol, word, or name on someone or something. Even though we all have our own cabinets, he still labels all his food with a black permanent marker. They labeled us with bright neon stamps so the bartenders knew we were old enough to drink.
See also: label
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

label someone or something with something

to mark or identify someone or something with something. They labeled each person who had paid the admission fee with a symbol stamped on the hand. I labeled each book with my name.
See also: label
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Relative to biracials who were religiously unaffiliated, those who identified with ethnically homogeneous religions were more likely to label themselves with a single racial category than as multiracial." For instance, in contrast to religiously unaffiliated black-white biracials, the likelihood of identifying as multiracial declined by 44% for black-white biracial Baptists.
It is an inspirational, frank and funny collection of essays by women detailing why they unashamedly label themselves with the F-word - and why we should too.