LSD

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LSD

An initialism of "lysergic acid diethylamide," commonly referred to simply as "acid," a hallucinogenic drug that alters one's thoughts or emotions or causes one to see or hear things that are not real. Somebody spiked his drink with LSD, and he spent the rest of the night tripping out in the corner of the room. One time, I took so much LSD that I hallucinated an entire conversation with a friend who wasn't even in the same room with me.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

LSD

n. lysergic acid diethylamide, a hallucinogenic drug. (Initialism. Drugs. A mainstay of the 1960s and 1970s drug culture.) LSD isn’t the problem it used to be, but it’s far from gone.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A Swiss chemist had discovered those properties of L.S.D. in 1943 and ten years later the C.I.A.
He sedated them for months at a time ("sleep therapy'), then "depatterned' them with massive electroshock treatment and frequent doses of L.S.D.; finally, he had them listen to tape-recorded messages, repeated up to a quarter-million times, during further periods of heavy sedation.
Harris Isbell, head of research at the Federal Addiction Research Center in Lexington, Kentucky, and the darling of such agencies as the National Institute of Mental Health and the Food and Drug Administration, also dosed human subjects with L.S.D. while on the C.I.A.
As research interest in L.S.D. grew during the 1950s, the C.I.A.
Gottlieb enjoyed lacing cocktails with L.S.D., and he did it at C.I.A.
enough so that it developed plans for using L.S.D. operationally.
By the mid-1960s nearly 1,500 military personnel had taken L.S.D. in tests run by the Army Chemical Corps.
Perhaps the most distinctive property of L.S.D. and its relatives is the extreme unpredictability of reactions to it.
At Stansbury there was no significant effect of subsoil amendment on soil moisture but there was a significant (P<0.001) effect of sampling date (at 0.2m, l.s.d.-0.0089; 0.6 m, l.s.d. = 0.023; and 0.8 m, l.s.d.
The ESP and EC were significantly (P<0.001) greater (ESP, l.s.d. 3%; EC, 1.s.d.=0.05dS/m) in the clay B horizon than the sandy A horizons (Table 3), but not at values that limit crop growth (maximum 0.17dS/m EC and ESP 12) (Peverill et al.
The main concern at this site was the significantly larger ESP values in the B horizon than the A horizon (P<0.001, l.s.d. = 2), which exceeded 15 by harvest time and would thus be considered to exceed the optimum for efficient water extraction by crops (Chhabra 1996).
At Stansbury, deep-tipping in 2007 combined with gypsum or nutrients produced a significantly lower penetration resistance than the control at 0.15-0.50m depth (P<0.001, l.s.d. = 0.53 MPa).
Dry matter (DM) weight at mid-tillering, grain harvest weight, and water use efficiency (WUE) at Stansbury (S) and Crystal Brook (CB) For each parameter, within sites, values followed by the same are not significantly different (l.s.d. at P = 0.05).