known


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also known as

Known by another name or description. Often abbreviated "AKA" or "a.k.a." both in speech and in writing. The Affordable Care Act, also known as "Obamacare," came into effect in 2014.
See also: also, known

(if the) truth be known

I must admit; to be honest; in actuality. Truth be known, even though I majored in English literature, I've never read anything by Hemingway! I know I said I wanted to go out to the bars tonight, but if the truth be known, I'd rather just stay home and watch a movie.
See also: known, truth

let it be known

1. To make something public knowledge. She's letting it be known that she is single and ready to start dating again.
2. An expression used to assert that something is true, especially in the face of criticism or distrust. I realize that many people here believe that my company has exploited its employees, but let it be known that we have never in our 50-year history done anything that would knowingly cause harm to our workers.
See also: known, let

for (a/some) reason(s) best known to (oneself)

For strange or perplexing reasons that the speaker cannot understand. For reasons best known to herself, Mom refuses to wear her glasses and goes around squinting at everything instead.
See also: known

make it known

To make something public knowledge. She's making it known that she is single and ready to start dating again. We must make it known that our company had no involvement in the scandal.
See also: known, make

make (oneself) known (to someone)

To introduce oneself (to someone); to make one's existence known (to someone). You should make yourself known to the consulate as soon as you arrive in the country. We're trying to make ourselves known to the leaders of the tech industry in the hopes of securing a sizable investment. He's been making himself known in various charities around the city.
See also: known, make

know enough to come in out of the rain

To have enough common sense to choose an obvious solution (like going inside if it starts raining). I'm not surprised his latest business venture failed too—that fool doesn't know enough to come in out of the rain.
See also: come, enough, know, of, out, rain

not know where to turn

1. To not have a source of aid or support that is readily available, apparent, or reliable. We were so crippled by debt that we didn't know where to turn. I just haven't known where to turn since my parents died.
2. To not have any idea about what to do next or about something. I don't know where to turn—we've tried everything we can think of to fix the login issue, but it's still there! And so I found myself alone in Las Vegas, with no car, no cell phone, and no money. I didn't know where to turn.
See also: know, not, turn

have known better days

To be or look particularly shabby, ill-kept, or in poor condition. Well, this car has known better days, but it's been reliable for me since the day I bought it 20 years ago. The poor guy who runs the building is a sweet fellow, but he has certainly known better days by the looks of him.
See also: better, days, have, known

a man is known by the company he keeps

A person tends to be very similar in attitude, character, ability, or personality to the people with whom they associate or spend time. I'm not surprised he turned out to be so conniving and disloyal—just look at the degenerates he hangs around with. A man is known by the company he keeps. If a man is known by the company he keeps, then it is fair to say that this young directors has a bright future ahead indeed.
See also: by, company, he, keep, known, man

not know enough to come in out of the rain

To not have very much intelligence or common sense, especially when facing or presented with a difficult situation. I'm not surprised his latest business venture failed too—that fool doesn't know enough to come in out of the rain. Cut him some slack, Jim. You didn't know enough to come in out of the rain when you were his age, either.
See also: come, enough, know, not, of, out, rain

if the truth were known

Prov. if people knew how something really was, instead of how it appears to be. If the truth were known, people wouldn't shop at that store. Its owners aren't as honest as they seem. Sam: You're always polite to Fred, but you don't really like him, do you? Alan: Well, no, if the truth were known.
See also: if, known, truth

knew it was coming

 and (had) known it was coming
to have expected in advance that something was to happen. I shouldn't act surprised. I knew it was coming. It's his own fault. He should have known it was coming.
See also: coming, knew

known fact

something that is generally recognized as a fact. That grass is green is a known fact. It is a known fact that John was in Chicago on the night of the murder.
See also: fact, known

known quantity

someone whose character, personality, and behavior are recognized and understood. We need not worry about how John will behave. He is a known quantity. Lisa is a known quantity and I am sure she will not surprise us by voting with the opposition.
See also: known, quantity

man is known by the company he keeps

Prov. A person tends to associate with people who are like him or her. Son, when you go away to school, spend your time with serious people; don't hang around with people who go to parties all the time. A man is known by the company he keeps. If you want to know what kind of person George is, look at his friends. A man is known by the company he keeps.
See also: by, company, he, keep, known, man

not know enough to come in out of the rain

Fig. to be very stupid. Bob is so stupid he doesn't know enough to come in out of the rain. You can't expect very much from somebody who doesn't know enough to come in out of the rain.
See also: come, enough, know, not, of, out, rain

not know where to turn

 and not know which way to turn
to have no idea about what to do (about something). I was so confused I didn't know where to turn. We needed help, but we didn't know which way to turn.
See also: know, not, turn

tree is known by its fruit

Prov. People judge your character by what you do. (Biblical.) The politician may say she believes in more spending on child care, but the tree is known by its fruit; she hasn't voted for a single measure that would help.
See also: by, fruit, known, tree

not know where to turn

Also, not know which way to jump or turn . Have no idea of how to get help or what course to take. For example, With all these offers coming in, he didn't know where to turn, or When her car was towed, Meg was distraught and did not know which way to jump. The first phrase dates from about 1400.
See also: know, not, turn

for reasons best known to himself (or herself, etc.)

used when recounting someone's behaviour to suggest that it is puzzling or perverse. chiefly humorous
See also: himself, known, reason

for a/some reason/reasons best known to himˈself, herˈself, etc.

(humorous) for a reason or reasons which other people find hard to understand: For reasons best known to himself, he wears two pairs of socks.
See also: known, reason

have seen/known better ˈdays

be in a worse condition than in the past: That jacket of yours has seen better days — isn’t it time you bought a new one?
See also: better, days, have, known, seen

let it be ˈknown/make it ˈknown that...

(formal) make sure that people are informed about something, especially by getting somebody else to tell them: The President has let it be known that he does not intend to run for election again.
See also: known, let, make

make yourself ˈknown to somebody

introduce yourself to somebody: I made myself known to the hotel manager.
See also: known, make, somebody

if (the) ˌtruth be ˈknown/ˈtold

used to tell somebody the true facts about a situation, especially when these are not known by other people: None of the students really liked the new teacher. In fact, if the truth be told, everyone was rather afraid of him.
See also: if, known, told, truth
References in periodicals archive ?
(19) For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them.
He was known for his work with foundry sand control.
Note that mailing a deficiency notice and demand for payment, addressed to both spouses, to the electing spouse's last known address does not start this two-year period.
INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN FASHION DESIGNER JEFFREY BANKS KNEW as a child growing up in Washington, D.C., that he wanted to be a designer.
You're known as a defender of the canon, but you manage to allow, for example in your supportive review of Francis Haskell's Rediscoveries in Art, a considerable sociological dimension to changes in taste.(2) If such canonical figures as Caravaggio, Piero, and Vermeer had to be rediscovered, can you still uphold a standard of objectivity?
She is known to be a prop to her husband's mind, and her husband is president of the United States.
The prover's aim is to persuade a verifier that such a path is known without giving the verifier the slightest idea of how to construct the path.
For example, the country then known as Tanganyika asked for surveyors, and we sent them people whose only connection with surveying had been holding the rod and chain while the surveyor sighted through his gizmo.
* Agencies must report clearances for specific offense breakdowns on either the Return A or the Monthly Return of Arson Offenses Known to Law Enforcement to be included in this table.
Before you moved to Southern California you were heavy into the drum and bass scene, DJing and the like, and were really well known for it in the UK.
We all borrow from each other as we seek to fulfill our shared calling of making Christ known.
She was a kid like other kids I knew, except she was the only one I'd known longer than a year.
In the introduction to my recently published book, Searching for Your Soul, I wrote about the "two worlds" I have always known: "the concrete, day-to-day physical world -- deadlines, desks, dinner -- the world of manifestation; and another world, the spiritual world of mystery, the world of God." But there are also other "worlds" that bisect this initial twinned reality: first, the world of the Christian -- the symbolic language of my earliest spiritual experiences which were largely Christ centered; and that of the Jew -- the religion of my birth, but not encountered until much later in life and then, as a baptized Christian.
For example, even though IRC sections 6212(a) and 6212(b) direct the IRS to send a deficiency notice to the taxpayer's last known address by certified or registered mail, neither the code nor the regulations
In Bell,(36) the issue was whether the spouse claiming relief should have known of the erroneous nature of a $90,000 interest deduction taken by her husband.