know the ropes


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Related to know the ropes: learn the ropes

know the ropes

To know the details or knowhow about a specific situation, task, job, or role. There's a lot to take in, but you'll know the ropes soon enough. This class is intense! You're expected to know the ropes from day one.
See also: know, rope

know the ropes

Be informed about the details of a situation or task. For example, Don't worry about Sara's taking over that reporter's job-she already knows the ropes. This expression alludes to sailors learning the rigging so as to handle a sailing vessel's ropes. It was being used figuratively by the late 1800s. The same allusion is present in show someone the ropes, meaning "to familiarize someone with the details," as in Tom's very experienced-he'll show you the ropes.
See also: know, rope

know the ropes

be thoroughly acquainted with the way in which something is done. informal
In its literal sense, this expression goes back to the days of sailing ships, when skill in handling ropes was essential for any sailor. The idiom is found in various forms, from the mid 19th century onwards, e.g. learn or understand the ropes and show or teach someone the ropes
See also: know, rope

show somebody/learn/know the ˈropes

(informal) explain to somebody/learn/know how to do a particular job, task, etc. correctly: It will take me a couple of weeks to learn the ropes but after that I should be fine.Mrs Brian will show you the ropes.This expression refers to a sailor learning the different ropes for the sails of a ship.
See also: know, learn, rope, show, somebody

know the ropes, to

To be well informed about the details of an operation, situation, or task. The term comes from the days of sailing ships, when sailors had to learn the details of the rigging in order to handle a ship’s ropes. It appeared in print in Richard Dana’s Two Years Before the Mast (1840) but was transferred to non-nautical matters by the late nineteenth century. Shaw used it and included a definition: “He knows the ropes: he knows his way about” (Fanny’s First Play, Introduction, 1911).
See also: know
References in periodicals archive ?
Barnet know the ropes about getting promotion and their current challenge is sustained on average attendances well short of 2,000.
You'd think having gone through five weddings already, loved-up Gail would know the ropes, so what's with the delay?
But we have handled cases like this before and we know the ropes. The client was very willing to work with us and go through every step of the process needed to overturn the ruling, and so the case came out fine.”
"We have six seniors who were part of last year's team, so they know the ropes," Cormier said.
I've been through the league, I know the ropes a bit.
These long-standing and capable gardeners; they know the ropes and were more than capable of looking after my little 'charges'.
It has been really useful to get to know the ropes from the shop floor, and to see how each aspect of the company works.
The decision came a race too late for rider Brian Hughes, who was given a hefty ten-day ban (October 18-27) for not riding out for third on Know The Ropes, who was fourth in the 2m6 1/2 f handicap chase.
Seeking investment when you don't know the ropes can be difficult but the Conference can provide the support and contacts needed to secure investment and help your business grow.
hexham: 2.30 Super Revo, 3.00 Poker De Sivola, 3.30 Fair Dual, 4.00 Sehoya, 4.30 Know The Ropes, 5.00 Ice Image, 5.30 Port Erne.
"All the three who will take charge have been working with Damon all season, so they know the ropes and there should be continuity.
We use ordinary people who know the ropes. They know what problems communities face and how to tackle them because they've been through it themselves.
Knox, assistant to Smith with Everton and before that with Rangers, will already be in poistion and know the ropes before Smith takes over.
"It's obviously nerve-wracking because I don't know the ropes really, William is obviously used to it, but I'm willing to learn quickly and work hard."
SEAFARERS in the days of sail literally had to know the ropes - but knots were equally important.