knock at the door

(redirected from knocking at the door)

knock at the door

1. To present (itself) as a possibility or (usually desirable) opportunity in the near future, especially temporarily. It was hard leaving my parents and all my friends from high school, but when an opportunity to attend school in Europe knocked at the door, I knew I had to seize the chance. What would you do if the chance to make half a million dollars was suddenly knocking at the door?
2. To try to become involved in some group or venture. If that kid is knocking at the door, you better let him join the team—he's really talented.
3. To be close to overtaking a competitor. Philly still sits atop the division, but Boston is knocking at the door with this win streak.
See also: door, knock
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
"And, mind ye, there's nae knocking at the door possible, when I've got the tray in baith my hands, and mairs the pity, the gout in baith my feet." With that friendly warning, Mr.
"I am certain there is somebody knocking at the Door." (said my Mother.) "I think there must," (replied my Father) "I fancy the servants are returned; (said I) I think I hear Mary going to the Door." "I'm glad of it (cried my Father) for I long to know who it is."
All at once there was heard a violent knocking at the door, and the old King, the Prince's father, went out himself to open it.
Masterson made his debut for Connacht last weekend against Scarlets just a few weeks after knocking at the door in the Sportsground looking for a trial.
in the meantime the watchman came knocking at the door after my husband phoned him," she said.
McClaren doesn't feel Johnson is knocking at the door for inclusion, he feels the pint-sized assassin is threatening to kick it down.
"Although the vast majority of children simply want to enjoy Halloween, some see it as an opportunity to obtain money or gifts and take exception to being turned away He said complaints about anti-social behaviour traditionally rise at this time of year and warned youngsters that repeatedly disturbing residents by knocking at the door or ringing the bell is committing an offence.