knock down

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knock down

1. To cause to topple or fall over, either intentionally or unintentionally, by a strike or collision of some kind. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "knock" and "down." I accidentally knocked down an old lady on the street today—I felt so bad! My toddler loves to stack up blocks and then knock them down, over and over again. They're going to use a wrecking ball to knock down that building.
2. slang To decrease something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "knock" and "down." I would knock down the oven temperature a little bit. You don't want to burn the turkey.
3. slang Reduce the price of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "knock" and "down." Don't tell my boss, but I can knock it down a couple hundred bucks for you.
4. To disassemble something in order to make it more manageable for storing or transporting; to break down. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "knock" and "down." We need to knock down these pallets before we can start to take stock of this merchandise.
5. slang To earn, as in a salary or other earnings. Mike never stops bragging about how he knocks down six figures a year.
6. To signal that something in an auction has been sold, as through the use of a gavel. The classic Mustang was finally knocked down after an intense back-and-forth bidding war.
7. To negotiate with someone with the result of them accepting a lower price, less favorable offer, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "knock" and "down." They tried to knock me down, but I told them I couldn't budge on the salary.
8. slang To take a drink of alcohol. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "knock" and "down." Sure, I'll go. I wouldn't mind knocking a few down at the bar.
9. slang To cause one to become drunk. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "knock" and "down." Dude, no thanks. Vodka always knocks me down hard.
See also: down, knock

knock someone or something down

to thrust someone or something to the ground by hitting. The force of the blast knocked us down. It knocked down everyone in the room.
See also: down, knock

knock something down

 
1. Sl. to drink a portion of liquor. Here, knock this down and let's go. He knocked down a bottle of beer and called for another.
2. Sl. to earn a certain amount of money. I'm lucky to knock down twenty thousand. She must knock down about twenty thou a year.
See also: down, knock

knock down

1. Take apart for storage or shipping, as in We need to knock down this chest to ship it safely overseas. [Mid-1900s]
2. Declare sold at an auction, as by striking a blow with a gavel. For example, That was the last bid, and the first edition was knocked down for only three hundred. [Mid-1700s]
3. Reduce the price of, as in They knocked it down by another hundred dollars, or An overabundant harvest will knock down corn prices. [Colloquial; mid-1800].
4. Earn as wages, as in She knocks down a hundred grand a year. [Slang; 1920s]
5. Steal, embezzle, as in He was caught knocking down the box-office receipts. This usage may be obsolescent. [Slang; mid-1800s] Also see knock over, def. 2.
See also: down, knock

knock down

v.
1. To bring something or someone to the ground with a blow; topple something or someone: The strong wind knocked down the power lines. The car went through the stop sign and almost knocked me down. We knocked down part of the wall and put in a door.
2. To cause something or someone to fall off or along something: The raccoons climbed on our roof and knocked some loose bricks down the chimney. I knocked the croquet balls down the lawn.
3. To disassemble something into parts, as for storage or shipping: I knocked down the tables and put them back in the closet. The vendors knock their stalls down at the end of the day.
4. To declare that a lot has been sold at an auction, as by striking a blow with a gavel: When the highest bid is called three times without an answer, the auctioneer knocks the lot down and the bidding is over. The auctioneer knocked down the lot to the highest bidder.
5. To reduce the price of something by some amount: The store has knocked all software down from $25 to just $15. We'll knock down your next purchase an additional 10 percent.
6. To reduce the level or value of something: I went to the thermostat and knocked the temperature down a few degrees. The company has knocked down the price of all their old products. For you, we'll knock the price down to $30.
7. To persuade someone to reduce an asking price: The owners wanted $100 for the furniture, but I knocked them down to $80. A good bargainer can knock down even the most resistant sellers.
8. Slang To receive some amount or rate as wages; earn something: Some bartenders knock down $200 an hour in tips alone.
9. Slang To intoxicate someone: Whatever was in that drink really knocked me down last night. A glass of this liquor will knock down even the biggest drinkers.
See also: down, knock

knock something down

1. tv. to drink a portion of liquor. He knocked down a bottle of beer and called for another.
2. tv. to earn a certain amount of money. She must knock down about twenty thou a year.
See also: down, knock, something
References in periodicals archive ?
The dog knocked her down and tore at her head, hands, arms and legs.
A MUGGER left a great grandmother black and blue after he got into her house, knocked her down and robbed her.
He told police he accidentally knocked her down some stairs.
On September 11, McCord pleaded guilty to inflicting grievous bodily harm on his girlfriend Cynthia Rigby after he knocked her down in the road.
When Hale tried to reach inside the car, she apparently became caught on the door and the front left portion of the car ran over her legs, knocked her down and sent her rolling down the driveway near the sidewalk.
A HUSBAND stopped to pick up his partner but skidded off the road and knocked her down, a court heard yesterday.
Anna Crosby was hosing down the run areas when an estimated 80-pound chow knocked her down and then began ``basically chewing her,'' said Gini Barrett, director of the Western Regional Office of the American Humane Association in Encino.
Jillian Robbins, a hunter with Army Reserve training who acquaintances said had a history of mental problems and was known as ``Crazy Jill,'' was hospitalized in serious condition with a stab wound suffered in a struggle with the student who came to the rescue and knocked her down.