knight

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all-nighter

1. The act of staying up all night to complete an activity, usually some kind of academic project. I'm going to have to pull an all-nighter if I'm going to get this term paper done in time for school tomorrow.
2. An establishment that remains open all night. Kyle and Amanda stopped at an all-nighter for a snack after the concert.
3. One who stays awake all night. Jess is a total all-nighter, so that third-shift job is perfect for her.

knight in shining armor

A selfless, chivalrous man who helps a woman in distress. When the police officer pulled over to help the old woman change her flat tire, she hugged him and said he was her knight in shining armor.
See also: armor, knight, shine

knight of the road

Someone, especially a man, who spends a lot of time traveling on the road, whether for business or pleasure, or because they are homeless. My dad was a knight of the road when I was younger, traveling almost nonstop in his car to sell his goods to businesses across the country. I introduced them to Charlie, one of the many knights of the road who sleep in this area after sundown.
See also: knight, of, road

white knight

1. One who saves another person from harm or a difficult situation. I don't remember much from the accident, but I am forever grateful to the white knight who freed me from my car. When Sally came to help with the kids when I was in the hospital, she really was our white night.
2. A person or company that purchases, or gives money to, another company that is in financial distress or about to be acquired by a third party. We all thought we were going to lose our jobs, but then a white knight purchased the company and saved it from bankruptcy.
See also: knight, white

knight in shining armor

A rescuer or defender, as in What this political party needs is a knight in shining armor to change its tarnished image . This metaphoric expression alludes to a medieval knight. [Mid-1900s]
See also: armor, knight, shine

a knight in shining armour

If you describe a man as a knight in shining armour, you mean that he has rescued you from a difficult situation, often in a kind and brave way. Note: `Armour' is spelled `armor' in American English. I just felt dizzy and then I collapsed. The next thing I woke up in hospital. I am very, very grateful to Tom and I always will be — he really was my knight in shining armour. She found a surprising knight in shining armor in her company's attorney, who rode in to save her job, rescue her love life and give her a place to live. Note: In stories written or set in the Middle Ages, a knight in shining armour traditionally came to the rescue of a `damsel (= young woman) in distress'.
See also: armour, knight, shine

a knight in shining armour

an idealized or heroic person, especially a man who comes to the rescue of a woman in distress or in a difficult situation.
This expression, a variant of which is a knight on a white charger , is often used ironically of someone who presents himself in this guise but is in fact inadequate to the role. Compare with a white knight (at white).
See also: armour, knight, shine

knight of the road

a man who frequents the roads, for example a travelling sales representative, lorry or taxi driver, or tramp.
Originally, in the mid 17th century, this phrase was ironically applied to a highwayman.
See also: knight, of, road

a white knight

a company that makes a welcome bid for a company facing an unwelcome takeover bid.
The image here is of the traditional figure from chivalric romances, who rides to the rescue of someone in danger. See also a knight in shining armour (at knight).
See also: knight, white

a knight in shining ˈarmour

(British English) (American English a knight in shining ˈarmor) (usually humorous) a man who arrives to help you when you are in trouble or danger: My car broke down at the roundabout. Luckily, a knight in shining armour stopped to help me.
See also: armour, knight, shine

all-nighter

1. n. something that lasts all night, like a party or study session. After an all-nighter studying, I couldn’t keep my eyes open for the test.
2. n. a place of business that is open all night. We stopped at an all-nighter for a cup of coffee.
3. n. a person who often stays up all night. I’m no all-nighter. I need my beauty sleep, for sure.

knight in shining armor, a

A rescuer or deliverer. This term, which recalls the age of chivalry through the image of a dashing knight on horseback clad in polished armor, dates from the sixteenth century but has been in figurative use only since the mid-twentieth century. John Ciardi pointed out that the phrase has been used with two meanings: the “Mr. Right” of a young girl’s dreams, rescuing her from the humdrum with the promise of romance, and in politics, the idealistic reformer. One might add a third, the white knight of the modern-day corporation, who rescues the company from a hostile raider and averts an unwanted takeover. Quite figuratively, the poet William Rose Benét wrote, “Like a knight in glittering armor, Laughter stood up at his side” (“The Last Ally”).
See also: knight, shine

knight in shining armor

A wonderful guy. Fairy tales chronicled fair maidens in distress who were rescued at the last minute from dragons and ogres by a gallant knight in gleaming armor, where-upon they all lived happily ever after. Even if a young woman didn't view herself as a princess or consider herself in desperate straits, she still imagined herself being carried off by the man of her dreams, Prince Charming, a knight in shining armor.
See also: armor, knight, shine
References in classic literature ?
'I wonder, now, what the Rules of Battle are,' she said to herself, as she watched the fight, timidly peeping out from her hiding-place: 'one Rule seems to be, that if one Knight hits the other, he knocks him off his horse, and if he misses, he tumbles off himself--and another Rule seems to be that they hold their clubs with their arms, as if they were Punch and Judy--What a noise they make when they tumble!
Another Rule of Battle, that Alice had not noticed, seemed to be that they always fell on their heads, and the battle ended with their both falling off in this way, side by side: when they got up again, they shook hands, and then the Red Knight mounted and galloped off.
'It was a glorious victory, wasn't it?' said the White Knight, as he came up panting.
It was of Eastern origin, having been brought from the Holy Land; and the mixture of the cymbals and bells seemed to bid welcome at once, and defiance, to the knights as they advanced.
Having intimated their more pacific purpose, the champions retreated to the extremity of the lists, where they remained drawn up in a line; while the challengers, sallying each from his pavilion, mounted their horses, and, headed by Brian de Bois-Guilbert, descended from the platform, and opposed themselves individually to the knights who had touched their respective shields.
A second and a third party of knights took the field; and although they had various success, yet, upon the whole, the advantage decidedly remained with the challengers, not one of whom lost his seat or swerved from his charge misfortunes which befell one or two of their antagonists in each encounter.
There was a fearful fight between the Knight and the Dragon, whose name is Error, but at length the Knight conquered.
The Knight and this aged man greeted each other fair and courteously, and as evening was now fallen the godly father bade the travelers come to his Hermitage for the night.
While his guests slept he wove evil spells about them, and calling a wicked dream he bade it sit at the Knight's head and whisper lies to him.
Harassed by this reflection, he made haste with his scanty pothouse supper, and having finished it called the landlord, and shutting himself into the stable with him, fell on his knees before him, saying, "From this spot I rise not, valiant knight, until your courtesy grants me the boon I seek, one that will redound to your praise and the benefit of the human race." The landlord, seeing his guest at his feet and hearing a speech of this kind, stood staring at him in bewilderment, not knowing what to do or say, and entreating him to rise, but all to no purpose until he had agreed to grant the boon demanded of him.
While the Knight was riding along the causeway to Emmet, a merry feast was toward in the refectory there.
Along the causeway rode a knight with a score of stout men-at-arms behind him.
There the Knight called to one of his men and bade him knock at the porter's lodge with the heft of his sword.
Seeing the other two outlaws approaching, the knight shrugged his shoulders, and replied indifferently.
So in the same lackadaisical fashion which had marked all his actions that day, the knight suffered his horse to be led to the rendezvous of the band in the greenwood.