kite


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be higher than a kite

1. To be very intoxicated by alcohol or (especially) drugs. I tried tutoring him in math, but he was always higher than a kite when I came by.
2. To be elated or euphorically happy. I was higher than a kite when I found out I got into Stanford.
See also: higher, kite

higher than a kite

1. Very intoxicated by alcohol or (especially) drugs. I tried tutoring him in math, but he was always higher than a kite when I came by.
2. Elated; euphorically happy. I was higher than a kite when I found out I got into my first choice school.
See also: higher, kite

higher than Gilderoy's kite

Extremely high; so high that it can hardly be seen. "Gilderoy" was the nickname of notorious 17th-century highwayman Patrick MacGregor, who was hanged at a time when the height of the gallows corresponded to the severity of a criminal's misdeeds. Thus, MacGregor was hanged higher than his accomplices—like a kite in the sky. Why did you put the dishes on a shelf higher than Gilderoy's kite? You know I can't reach anything up there! A: "Can you see the plane?" B: "It's higher than Gilderoy's kite! All I see is a tiny speck!"
See also: higher, kite

be as high as a kite

1. slang To be very intoxicated with drugs or alcohol. Do you remember last night at all? You were as high as a kite!
2. To be very happy. I was as high as a kite when I found out that I'd gotten an A on my hardest exam.
See also: high, kite

fly a kite

1. To suggest something in order to gauge interest in it or others' perception of it. When everyone objected to my idea, I reassured them that I was just flying a kite and had not made any sort of decision on the matter.
2. To ponder a potential reason or explanation for something. Oh, you're just flying a kite—you don't really know why Emily didn't come to the party.
See also: fly, kite

kite flying

1. The practice of telling or suggesting an idea or plan to people in order to gauge their reaction to it. I can always tell when my boss is kite flying, because she suddenly starts mentioning vague details about projects we've never heard of.
2. The practice of drawing checks on an overdrawn account and lodging them into another account in order to create a false credit balance. Primarily heard in UK. He had been using kite flying to keep his business financially afloat for nearly a year before being caught by banking authorities.
See also: flying, kite

go fly a kite

To go away and leave one alone because what is being done or said is very irritating. Often used as an imperative. A: "The experiment might work better if you actually knew what you were supposed to be mixing together." B: "You know what, Jenny? Why don't you go fly a kite?"
See also: fly, go, kite

be flying a kite

To be suggesting something in order to gauge interest in it. When everyone objected to my idea, I reassured them that I was just flying a kite and had not made any sort of decision on the matter.
See also: flying, kite

(as) high as a kite

1. Literally, very high in terms of height or distance. The balloon flew as high as a kite when the little girl let it go.
2. slang Very intoxicated with drugs or alcohol. Do you remember last night at all? You were as high as a kite!
3. Very happy. I was as high as a kite when I found out that I'd gotten an A on my hardest exam.
See also: high, kite

fly kites

To write a check that exceeds the amount currently in its bank account and then depositing the check at a second bank, so that one can use funds from the second bank—at least until one gets caught. A: "Is it true that Drew got busted for writing bad checks?" B: "Oh yeah, he was flying kites all over town."
See also: fly, kite

Go chase yourself!

 and Go climb a tree!; Go fly a kite!; Go jump in the lake!
Inf. Go away and stop bothering me! Bob: Get out of here. Bill! You're driving mecrazy! Go chase yourself'. Bill: What did I do to you? Bob: You're just in the way. Bill: Dad, can I have ten bucks? Father: Go climb a tree! Fred: Stop pestering me, John. Go jump in the lake! John: What did I do? Bob: Well, Bill, don't you owe me some money? Bill: Go fly a kite!
See also: chase, go

*high as a kite

 and *high as the sky 
1. Lit. very high. (*Also: as ~.) The tree grew as high as a kite. Our pet bird got outside and flew up high as the sky.
2. Fig. drunk or drugged. (*Also: as ~.) Bill drank beer until he got as high as a kite. The thieves were high as the sky on drugs.
See also: high, kite

go fly a kite

Also, go chase yourself or climb a tree or jump in the lake or sit on a tack or soak your head . Go away and stop bothering me, as in Quit it, go fly a kite, or Go jump in the lake. All of these somewhat impolite colloquial imperatives date from the first half of the 1900s and use go as described under go and.
See also: fly, go, kite

high as a kite

Intoxicated, as by alcohol, as in After three beers she's high as a kite. The adjective high has been used in the sense of "drunk" since the early 1600s; the addition of kite dates from the early 1900s. The phrase is now used of disorientation due to any drug.
See also: high, kite

high as a kite

INFORMAL
If someone is as high as a kite, they feel very excited, or they are strongly affected by alcohol or drugs. When I finally finished the course I felt as high as a kite. I felt so strange on the steroid injections. I was as high as a kite some of the time.
See also: high, kite

be flying a kite

mainly BRITISH
If someone is flying a kite, they are suggesting ideas or possibilities in order to see how people react to them before making a decision about them. The committee has paid a good deal of attention to what might be politically possible. It is consciously flying a kite. The idea came from a senator, but it seems likely that he was flying a kite for the secretary of state. Note: You can also talk about kite-flying. Bracken says he does not want to start kite-flying for his candidacy.
See also: flying, kite

fly a kite

try something out to test opinion. informal
A historical sense of this phrase was ‘raise money by an accommodation bill’, meaning to raise money on credit, and this sense of testing public opinion of your creditworthiness gave rise to the current figurative sense. The US phrase go fly a kite! means ‘go away!’.
See also: fly, kite

high as a kite

intoxicated with drugs or alcohol. informal
This expression is a play on high meaning ‘lofty’ and its informal sense ‘intoxicated’.
See also: high, kite

fly a ˈkite

(British English, informal) release a bit of information, etc. in order to test public reaction to something that you plan to do at a later date: Let’s fly a kite. Tell the papers that the government is thinking of raising the school leaving age to 18, and we’ll see what the reaction is.
A kite is a kind of toy that you fly in the air at the end of one or more long strings. It will tell you which way the wind is blowing.
See also: fly, kite

(go) fly a/your ˈkite

(American English, informal) used to tell somebody to go away and stop annoying you or interfering
See also: fly, kite

(as) high as a ˈkite

(informal) in an excited state, especially because of drugs, alcohol, etc: He was as high as a kite when they came to arrest him.
See also: high, kite

fly kites

tv. to distribute or pass bad checks. (see also kite.) Marty was picked up for flying kites in three different cities.
See also: fly, kite

Go chase yourself!

and Go chase your tail! and Go climb a tree! and Go fly a kite! and Go fry an egg! and Go jump in the lake! and Go soak your head! and Go soak yourself!
exclam. Beat it!; Go away! Oh, go chase yourself! Go soak your head! You’re a pain in the neck.
See also: chase, go

Go fly a kite!

verb
See also: fly, go

kite

1. n. a drug user who is always high. (Drugs.) The guy’s a kite. He won’t make any sense no matter what you ask him.
2. tv. to write worthless checks; to raise the amount on a check. (see also fly kites.) Chuck made a fortune kiting checks.
3. n. a worthless check. (Underworld.) He finally wrote one kite too many, and they nabbed him.

kited

mod. alcohol intoxicated. (From high as a kite.) Britney was too kited to see her hand in front of her.
See also: kite

go climb a tree/fly a kite

Go away and stop annoying me. There are many other versions of these colloquial imperatives, from go chase yourself, dating from about 1900, to go jump in the lake, sit on a tack, or soak your head, also of twentieth-century provenance. All could be classed as clichés. See also go to the devil.
See also: climb, fly, go, kite, tree

go fly a kite

Get lost! Kite flying is an activity that is done far less now than in previous centuries. Accordingly, “go fly a kite!” is heard far less than “get lost!” “take a hike!” and “get your ass out of here!” (or something stronger).
See also: fly, go, kite
References in periodicals archive ?
The Burkhardts created a large, rectangular kite for the competition.
HELIUM TANKS If you start out a day with plenty of wind to fly kites but the wind diminishes or stops during your trip, having a helium tank on board will allow you to fill your helium balloons while out on the water instead of return to port to buy an inflated balloon at a tackle store or marina.
They were joined by the Free J's four-line kite display team from the North East, Tall and Small, a young couple who fly four-line kites to music, and the Sky Artists, a team of kite fliers flying some of the largest kites seen in the area for many years.
A total of eight varieties of kites were showcased at the exhibition and the kite making workshop was attended by 15 children from different expatriate communities in Qatar.
The festival coincides with Uttarayan, the country's largest kite festival during which the entire city takes to the rooftops, and has become a favourite destination for hundreds of kite fliers from across the world.
" This is the normal trend in the kite market in Jamalpur for years," says Yusuf Sindhi from Jamalpur.
Warning us not to let the kite enter the power zone, he shows us how to get it airborne and hands over the bar the strings are attached to, which is just wide enough to allow both hands to grip it comfortably, shoulder-width apart.
The one-hour mima craft workshops, held at noon, 1pm and 2pm, use the Kites for Schools format (www.kitesforschools.co.uk).
For Elise Allain from the US and her friends, the colourful kites flying across the sky were a wonderful way to start the weekend.
As soon as the meat has been put out the kites, circling overhead, dive down and clutch meat in their talons.
With the city of Kabul stretched out below us, Ali and I launched our kite, with a local Afghan boy on hand to hold the spool.
The UK's finest kite flyers will be bringing kites of all shapes and sizes to the annual Whitley Bay International Kite Festival, on the Links this Saturday and Sunday.
Maybe you should listen to them; lots of great, fun, and wonderful accomplishments have come from the simple act of flying a kite.
Release date- 29072019 - A new generation of kite wind turbines can supplement land-based wind turbines and produce energy in rural areas without a power grid.
LAHORE -- The police have arrested 196 persons for manufacturing and flying kite during the last month.