kick off

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kick off

1. verb To remove one from a group or eliminate one from a contest. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "kick" and "off." Greg got kicked off the basketball team because of his grades. You're going to kick me off student council because I missed one meeting? That's not fair! My favorite contestant got kicked off the reality show last night.
2. verb In American football, to kick the ball to the opposing team, as happens at the beginning of each half and after any scoring drive. The home team will be kicking off to start the second half.
3. verb To begin or mark the start of something, such as an event, a series, or a period of time. In this usage, a noun of pronoun can be used between "kick" and "off." The radio station is going to kick off its membership drive with a two-day music marathon. When the new school year started, we kicked it off with a pep rally, and the kids really loved it. We're going to kick off the new year with a huge party.
4. verb To disconnect one from a virtual network or platform. Often used in the passive voice. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "kick" and "off." Remember when the Internet was tied to the phone line, and you would get kicked off if someone picked up the phone? I tried to log in but I got the password wrong too many times so I got kicked off temporarily.
5. verb, slang To die. If they invent a hoverboard before I kick off, I'm definitely going to try it, no matter how old I am.
6. noun In American football, the act of kicking the ball to the opposing team, as happens at the beginning of each half and after any scoring drive. In this usage, the term is usually hyphenated of spelled as one word. Two minutes to kick-off, everyone! Grab a snack and find a seat!
7. noun The beginning of something or an activity or ceremony that marks the start something, such as an event, a series, or a period of time. In this usage, the term is usually hyphenated of spelled as one word. The radio station's kick-off to its membership drive was a two-day music marathon. We held a pep rally as a kick-off to the new school, and the kids really loved it. We're going to throw a huge party as the kickoff to the new year.
See also: kick, off

kick something off (of) someone or something

 and kick something off
to knock something off someone or something by kicking. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The baby must have kicked her covers off of herself in the night. She kicked off her covers in the night.
See also: kick, off

kick something off

Fig. to begin something; to hold a party or ceremony to mark the start of something. (Alludes to starting a football game by kicking off the ball for the first play.) The city kicked the centennial celebration off with a parade. They kicked off the celebration with a parade.
See also: kick, off

kick off

 
1. Lit. to start play in a football game by kicking the ball. Tom kicked off in the last game. Now it's my turn. John tripped when he was kicking off.
2. and kick the bucket Fig. to die. Don't say that George Washington "kicked off." Say that he "passed away." My cat kicked off last night. She was tough as a lion. When I kick the bucket, I want a huge funeral with lots of flowers and crying.
See also: kick, off

kick off

1. Start, begin, as in They kicked off the celebration with a parade. This term alludes to starting play by kicking the ball in soccer, football, and similar sports. [Mid-1800s]
2. See kick in, def. 2.
See also: kick, off

kick off

v.
1. To begin; start: The party will kick off around 4:00, so we need to leave here at 3:30.
2. To begin something; cause something to start: The author kicked off the book tour with a press conference. Our annual film festival starts tomorrow, and we will be kicking it off with a screening of contemporary African films.
3. To expel someone from some official group: I was such a bad player that they finally kicked me off the team. I served on the committee for a few months, but they soon kicked me off for not going to the meetings. I got kicked off the swim team for drinking alcohol during the season.
4. To suddenly disconnect someone from some computer network. Used chiefly in the passive: I was kicked off the Internet while I was downloading some software.
5. Sports To begin or resume play by kicking a ball: The home team kicked off at the top of the second half.
See also: kick, off

kick (off)

in. to die. We’ve been waiting for years for that cat to kick off.
See also: kick, off