kick back

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kick back

1. verb To recoil, as of a gun that has been fired. If you're not careful, that rifle will bruise your shoulder when it kicks back.
2. verb To relax, typically by reclining and/or engaging in a sedentary activity. Often used in the phrase "kick back and relax." After a long day of yardwork, I love to kick back and relax on a lawn chair with a tall glass of lemonade. I like going to the movies, but I prefer kicking back with a good book at home.
3. noun A percentage of a profit paid to someone who facilitated the profit, typically through illegal means, such as using a government position to ease restrictions on a business deal. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated or written as one word. The politician was receiving kickbacks for years, and now the full extent of his corruption has been revealed.
4. noun The recoil of a gun. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated or written as one word. Careful, that rifle's got a heck of a kickback.
See also: back, kick

kick something back (to someone or something)

to move something back to someone, something, or some place by kicking. I kicked the ball back to Walter. He kicked it to me, and I kicked it back.
See also: back, kick

kick back (at someone or something)

to kick at someone or something in revenge. She kicked at me, so I kicked back at her. If you kick me, I'll kick back.
See also: back, kick

kick back

 
1. Inf. to relax; to lean back and relax. (See also lie back.) I really like to kick back and relax. It's time to kick back and enjoy life.
2. . Inf. [for an addict] to return to an addiction or a habit, after having "kicked the habit." Lefty kicked back after only a few days of being clean. A lot of addicts kick back very soon.
See also: back, kick

kick back

1. Recoil unexpectedly and violently, as in This rifle kicks back a lot when you fire it. [Early 1800s]
2. Return stolen property to the owner, as in The pawnbroker kicked back the paintings to the gallery. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
3. Pay back a part of one's earnings, as in The workers were forced to kick back half their pay to the agent. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
See also: back, kick

kick back

v.
1. To return something by kicking it: I'll roll the ball to you, and then you kick it back. The goalie kicked back the soccer ball.
2. To recoil unexpectedly and violently: Be careful with that power saw—if it kicks back, you could be badly injured. Hold the rifle tightly—otherwise it will kick back and bruise your shoulder.
3. To relax, especially by resting: I was too tired to work last night, so I just kicked back at home and watched TV.
4. Slang To pay someone in return for an illegal favor: The corrupt official kicked $1,000 back to the politicians who helped him get the grant money. If you can kick back some of your profits, I'll make sure you win that contract.
See also: back, kick

kick back

1. in. to relax (and enjoy something). I like to kick back and listen to a few tunes.
2. n. money received in return for a favor. (Usually kickback.) The kickback the cop got wasn’t enough, as it turned out.
3. in. [for an addict] to return to addiction after having been detoxified and withdrawn. (Drugs.) They may kick back a dozen times before it takes.
See also: back, kick
References in periodicals archive ?
This reduces kickback tendency, but it also reduces cutting efficiency.
According to the SEC's complaint, Norway-based Nycomed entered into nine contracts with Iraqi ministries involving the payment of approximately $750,000 in cash kickbacks between 2000 and 2002.
Also, Omnicare regularly paid kickbacks to nursing homes by providing consultant pharmacist services at rates below the company's cost--and below fair market value for such, services--in order to induce the homes to refer their patients to Omnicare for pharmacy services, the government alleged.
Leslie Berk and her management company, Prism Management, are charged with allegedly taking more than $55,000 in kickbacks at eight buildings managed from 1995 to 1998.
1) Whoever knowingly and willfully solicits or receives any remuneration (including any kickback, bribe, or rebate) directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly, in cash or in kind--
Attorney Booth Goodwin said February 25 that Ronald Barnette, 54, was recently sentenced to three years of probation, including six months of home confinement, along with a $20,000 fine for lying about paying kickbacks at Arch Coal's Mountain Laurel mining complex.
The indictment said Wagner and AFI paid kickbacks to Wayne Kepple, an ex-vice president of ground operations for Ryan, in return of offering contract to AFI.
Every horse sent to us through you or your recommendation will earn you a 15 per cent kickback of the livery fee.
EMC was also accused of participating in an illegal kickback scheme in which consulting companies were paid by EMC each time they recommended an EMC product to a government agency.
4 million bribery and kickback scheme, reports Caribbean Net News (Aug.
Whitt pleaded guilty in October to conspiracy to commit money laundering in a Michigan kickback case.
Attorney for the Southern District of New York and sued by the federal Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) last December for allegedly siphoning off nearly $7 million over five years in a kickback scheme.
In that letter the writer asked whether a 50% discount on PPS services offered by an ambulance service provider to a SNF could be viewed as a kickback.
One month after being charged in a federal court for their part in a multimillion-dollar kickback scheme at an Arch Coal operation in southern West Virginia, two former mine contractors pleaded guilty to their parts in the circle and now await sentencing.
Novartis began the kickback scheme in 2007 after becoming concerned that patients were discontinuing Exjade due to its side effects.