kick up one's heels

kick up (one's) heels

To enjoy oneself without restraint. Now that that big acquisition is finally over, we can kick up our heels and celebrate!
See also: heel, kick, up

kick up one's heels

Enjoy oneself, as in When she retires, she plans to kick up her heels and travel. This expression originated about 1600 with a totally different meaning, "to be killed." The modern sense, alluding to a prancing horse or exuberant dancer, dates from about 1900.
See also: heel, kick, up

kick up one's heels, to

To enjoy oneself exuberantly; to frolic. This term, which calls to mind a prancing horse or a vigorous dancer, originally meant to be knocked down or killed. Thomas Dekker used it in this sense in his play, The Honest Whore (1604): “I would not for a duckat she had kickt up her heeles.” The modern sense dates from the late nineteenth or early twentieth century.
See also: kick, up