kick in


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kick in

1. To kick something with the intention or result of breaking or caving it inward. In this usage, a noun of pronoun is sometimes used between "kick" and "in." The burglars kicked in the door, but they fled when the alarm system went off. They threatened to kick my head in if I didn't do as they asked.
2. To contribute an amount to a pool of money. I kicked in a few bucks to the charity drive they're doing at the office. Marjorie is collecting for this week's lottery pool, so don't forget to kick in.
3. To begin working or becoming effective. You'll feel a lot better when the medication kicks in. The lights need a few minutes to warm up, but we can start as soon as they kick in.
See also: kick
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

kick something in (on something) (for someone or something)

to contribute something, such as money, on something for someone or something. I will kick a few bucks in on some flowers for the receptionist. I will kick in a few bucks on the gift for Marge.
See also: kick

kick in (on something) (for someone or something)

Fig. to contribute to something for someone or something. Would you like to kick in on a gift for Joel? I'll be happy to kick in on a gift. Sure, I would like to kick in for the gift—
See also: kick
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

kick in

1. Contribute one's share, as in We'll kick in half if you take care of the rest. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
2. Also, kick off. Die, as in No one knows when he'll kick in, or He finally kicked off yesterday. [Slang; first half of 1900s] Also see kick the bucket.
3. Begin to operate, as in Finally the motor kicked in and we could get started. This usage was first recorded in 1908.
See also: kick
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

kick in

v.
1. To break or smash a hole in something with a kick: The police kicked in the door. The burglar kicked the windows in to enter the house.
2. To contribute something, especially money: The boss kicked in $20 for the office party. I kicked a few bucks in to buy them a gift.
3. To become operative or take effect: I got dizzy when the medication kicked in.
See also: kick
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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