keep to (something or oneself)

(redirected from kept to oneself)

keep to (something or oneself)

1. To adhere to something, such as a plan or a rule; to stick to something. Please keep to the plan, and everything will go smoothly. How can I trust you if you never keep to your promises?
2. To stay somewhere or to not go away or far from somewhere, typically because of some restriction. Keep to the front yard, kids—I don't want to see you running in the street. The princess hated that she always had to keep to the castle.
3. To refrain from attempting to communicate or make connections with others. If you want to make friends, you can't keep to yourself all the time. Start meeting people! The old man down the street always keeps to himself. I just realized I don't even know his name.
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keep to something

to adhere to an agreement; to follow a plan; to keep a promise. Please keep to the agreed-upon plan. Can you keep to what we agreed on?
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keep something to oneself

to keep something a secret. I want you to keep this news to yourself. This should be kept to yourself.
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keep to oneself

to be solitary; to stay away from other people. Ann tends to keep to herself. She doesn't have many friends. I try to keep to myself each morning so I can get some work done.
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keep to

1. Adhere to, conform to, as in Let's keep to the original purpose of this will. [Early 1600s]
2. Confine oneself to, as in Whenever she didn't feel well, she kept to her bed. Also see keep to oneself.
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keep to oneself

1. Also, keep oneself to oneself. Shun the company of others, value one's privacy, as in She kept to herself all morning, or, as Doris Lessing put it in In Pursuit of the English (1960): "She keeps herself to herself so much." [Late 1600s]
2. Refrain from revealing, hold secret, as in He promised to keep the news to himself. Also see the synonym keep under one's hat.
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keep to

v.
1. To refrain from venturing away from some place or activity: Because of the rain, the kids mostly kept to their rooms.
2. To adhere to some plan; stick with something: We should ignore these new projects and keep to the original purpose of our organization.
3. To remain private, unsociable, or uncommunicative. Used reflexively: The people at the party were not very friendly, so I kept to myself.
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keep to (oneself)

1. To shun the company of others: She kept to herself all morning.
2. To refrain from divulging: He kept the news to himself.
See also: keep
References in periodicals archive ?
The film is painfully intimate, to the point of inducing grimaces among audience members who may find themselves agreeing with Tanios' brother and mother when they tell him that grief is a transitory thing that is best kept to oneself.
With the anti-administration sentiment came a sense that favorable views toward Bush were best kept to oneself, particularly as the war in Iraq turned into a quagmire.
It is my life, and there are certain things that should be kept to oneself.
Long gone are the days when hostelers had to arrive on foot, be indoors before 10pm and notions of alcohol were best kept to oneself.
Asian immigrants, in particular, are very unlikely to seek out mental health care because in Asian cultures, even more than Western cultures, personal problems tend to be kept to oneself.
The details of my 'do' are best kept to oneself, as raking it all up is far too painful (I have the bruises to prove it
Seasoned politicians should quietly tell Mr Healey that such thoughts, however true they may be, are best kept to oneself.