keep to (oneself)

(redirected from keep to themselves)

keep to (oneself)

1. To refrain from attempting to communicate or make connections with others. If you want to make friends, you can't keep to yourself all the time. Start meeting people! The old man down the street always keeps to himself. I just realized I don't even know his name.
2. To not reveal or share some thought, idea, opinion, or piece of information with anyone else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "keep" and "to." Please tell them to keep the news to themselves for the time being. We're not ready to announce anything publicly yet. You really shouldn't keep your feelings to yourself like that.
See also: keep
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

keep to something

to adhere to an agreement; to follow a plan; to keep a promise. Please keep to the agreed-upon plan. Can you keep to what we agreed on?
See also: keep

keep something to oneself

to keep something a secret. I want you to keep this news to yourself. This should be kept to yourself.
See also: keep

keep to oneself

to be solitary; to stay away from other people. Ann tends to keep to herself. She doesn't have many friends. I try to keep to myself each morning so I can get some work done.
See also: keep
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

keep to

1. Adhere to, conform to, as in Let's keep to the original purpose of this will. [Early 1600s]
2. Confine oneself to, as in Whenever she didn't feel well, she kept to her bed. Also see keep to oneself.
See also: keep

keep to oneself

1. Also, keep oneself to oneself. Shun the company of others, value one's privacy, as in She kept to herself all morning, or, as Doris Lessing put it in In Pursuit of the English (1960): "She keeps herself to herself so much." [Late 1600s]
2. Refrain from revealing, hold secret, as in He promised to keep the news to himself. Also see the synonym keep under one's hat.
See also: keep
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ˌkeep something to yourˈself

not tell other people about something: I don’t want John to know about this, so keep it to yourself. OPPOSITE: spread the word
See also: keep, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

keep to

v.
1. To refrain from venturing away from some place or activity: Because of the rain, the kids mostly kept to their rooms.
2. To adhere to some plan; stick with something: We should ignore these new projects and keep to the original purpose of our organization.
3. To remain private, unsociable, or uncommunicative. Used reflexively: The people at the party were not very friendly, so I kept to myself.
See also: keep
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

keep to (oneself)

1. To shun the company of others: She kept to herself all morning.
2. To refrain from divulging: He kept the news to himself.
See also: keep
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Not many leagues from here is a tribe of Jews whose ancestors fled thither after an unsuccessful revolt against King David, and these their descendants are still under a ban and keep to themselves.
In spite of odd ways they were said to be, for the most part, quite respectable; but they preferred to keep to themselves. Medora Manson, in her prosperous days, had inaugurated a "literary salon"; but it had soon died out owing to the reluctance of the literary to frequent it.
Probably its regular visitants, like the initiates of freemasonry, wished that there were something a little more tremendous to keep to themselves concerning it; but they were not a closed community, and many decent seniors as well as juniors occasionally turned into the billiard-room to see what was going on.
They've worked hard their entire lives, they keep to themselves and help others, and this is what they get in return."
The ROA does not then give any logical reasoning behind these statements, so must we assume the wind operation is an occurrence owners would just rather keep to themselves? And folk wonder why punters think 'those in the know' have a massive advantage over the man or woman in the street.
The former education chief pointed out that he understood that some would rather choose to keep to themselves, especially on social media where dissenting opinions are easily silenced by the armies of trolls.
"Running with the Hounds" speaks to the burdens of memory that veterans of every war keep to themselves.
While the players decided to keep to themselves on Saturday, they travelled to Colombo on Sunday for the second Test starting on Thursday.
Brie soon learns that the islanders prefer to keep to themselves, and the lies they tell to protect themselves cause her to consider everyone a suspect.
Daley, who's in a relationship with 39-year-old Oscar-winning screenwriter and gay rights activist, Dustin Lance Black, added that people should keep to themselves and shouldn't be bothered by his choices.
"Admitting to unforgiving menopause symptoms is still something working women prefer to keep to themselves."
Instead an increasing number of residents appear to be happy to keep to themselves, viewing the family next door as complete strangers.
Only minutes from the industry of Swansea and Port Talbot, Gower is still a secret and private place the locals like to keep to themselves. This brand new series witnesses a year in the life of Gower and some of the people whose families have been there for generations.
They keep to themselves, but that time our barn caught fire they were
The internet is a wonderful tool, but there can be no substitute for seeing the actual paintings, which is not a privilege councillors should keep to themselves.