keep out (of something)

keep out (of something)

1. To refrain from accessing or entering some thing or place. Keep out, kids—those snacks for the party! We have to keep out of Dad's shed because it could be dangerous with all the tools that are in there.
2. To stop someone or something from accessing or entering some thing or place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "out." Those snacks are for the party, so keep the kids out of the pantry. Please keep your dog out of my garden.
3. To avoid discussing someone or something. Keep my mother out of this! What has she ever done to you?
4. To avoid being involved or meddling in something. It's my wedding, isn't it? So keep out of my plans. Keep out of my business!
5. To stop someone from being involved or meddling in something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "out." Keep your mother out of my wedding planning meetings, OK?
6. To remain clear of some path or course. Please keep out of the road until the work has been completed.
7. To remove someone or something from some path or route. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "out." Please keep these boxes out of the way of the trucks. Students are reminded to keep their backpacks out of the aisles during class.
8. To avoid being a nuisance or impediment to someone. I know you're new here, so I'm willing to cut you a little slack, but keep out of my way, you hear me?
9. To stop someone or something from being a nuisance or impediment to someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "out." I don't care if you want to hire him, but keep him out of my way!
10. To avoid entering some unfavorable state or condition. He was always a good student who kept out of trouble. The young nation has so far kept out of the war, having lost too many young citizens during its fight for independence. The prisoners kept out of sight as they snuck past the guards.
11. To stop someone or something from entering some unfavorable state, condition, or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "out." I tried my best to keep my kids out of harm's way. Many believe he paid off doctors to keep him out of the draft.
See also: keep, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

keep someone or something out

 (of something)
1. to prevent someone or something from getting into something or some place. Keep your kids out of my yard. She just couldn't keep herself out of the cookie jar.
2. to keep the subject of someone or something out of a discussion. Keep the kids out of this! I don't want to talk about them. They kept Dorothy out of the discussion.
See also: keep, out

keep out

 (of something)
1. Lit. to remain outside something or some place. You should keep out of the dark-room when the door is closed. The door is closed. Keep out!
2. Fig. to remain uninvolved with something. Keep out of this! It's my affair. It's not your affair. Keep out!
See also: keep, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

keep out

v.
1. To prevent something or someone from entering a space: The lid keeps the flies out of the jar. I have a screen door to keep out stray animals.
2. To remain in an external place: I respect your privacy; I'll keep out of your room. There are a dangerous animals in that cage, so keep out!
3. keep out of To refrain from interfering with something, especially someone's affairs: I think they should keep out of our argument. Keep the children out of it.
4. keep out of To prevent someone from interfering with something: I tried to keep the children out of our family's problems.
See also: keep, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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