keep in


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Related to keep in: keep up, keep in check, keep in touch

keep in

1. To physically hold or force someone or something to stay in a particular space or area. A noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "in." Keep the kids in the house while I try to scare off this raccoon. Can you please keep the dog in his crate when Clara comes over? She's afraid of dogs.
2. To store something in a particular place. A noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "in." Why do you insist on keeping the raisins in the refrigerator? They're hard as a rock now!
3. To restrain something, usually laughter. A noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "in." I had a hard time keeping in my laughter when Uncle Ned walked in wearing that gigantic straw hat of his.
4. To keep someone informed about and/or involved in something, such as a plan or project, especially that which involves or pertains to a specific group. A noun or pronoun can be used between "keep" and "in." We've hired a new intern to help you with data entry, so be sure to keep her in on the project.
See also: keep
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

keep (someone or an animal) in

to make someone or an animal stay inside. I will have to keep Billy in until his cold is better. Keep the dog in. It's too cold for her to go out. Keep in the children and the animals until it warms up.
See also: keep

keep someone or something in some place

to house or maintain someone or something in some place. We keep the boys in an apartment just off campus. It's cheaper than three dormitory rooms. We can keep your dog in the garage until you return.
See also: keep, place
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

keep in

v.
1. To hold or maintain someone or something inside of something else: I wish you wouldn't keep the onions in the same drawer as the bread.
2. To restrain someone or something within some place: It's raining very hard, so keep the cat in tonight. I couldn't keep in my laughter when I heard the joke.
3. To provide someone with some information needed to take part in a group activity: We met with them every week to keep them in on the job that we were doing.
See also: keep
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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