keep company

(redirected from keep company with)
Also found in: Legal.

keep company

1. To spend time with one for the sake of companionship, or in order to keep them from being lonely. In this usage, a noun or pronoun appears between "keep" and "company." Can you keep me company for a while? I've felt so cooped up without anyone to talk to. At the very least, Trish will have her dog to keep her company on the trip.
2. To associate (with). The people you keep company with reflect greatly on your character.
3. dated To court someone. Lord Nelson has been keeping company with a commoner, and the village is astir.
See also: company, keep

keep someone company

to sit or stay with someone, especially someone who is lonely. I kept my uncle company for a few hours. He was very grateful for someone to keep him company. He gets very lonely.
See also: company, keep

keep company

 (with someone)
1. Lit. to spend much time with someone; to associate with or consort with someone. Bill has been keeping company with Ann for three months. Bob has been keeping company with a tough-looking bunch of boys.
2. Fig. to be courting someone. Mary and Bill are keeping company. I heard that Joe is keeping company with Jim Brown's daughter.
See also: company, keep

keep company

1. Also, keep company with. Associate with; also, carry on a courtship. For example, He keeps company with a wild bunch, or Jack and Françoise kept company for two years before they married. [Mid-1500s]
2. keep someone company. Accompany or remain with someone, as in Mary kept Mother company while she shopped, or Do you want me to stay and keep you company? This term was originally put as bear someone company. [c. 1300]
See also: company, keep

keep somebody ˈcompany

spend time with somebody so that they are not alone: I’ve promised to keep my sister company while her husband is away.
See also: company, keep, somebody

keep (someone) company

To accompany or remain with.
See also: company, keep

keep company

1. To carry on a courtship: a couple who kept company but never married.
2. To socialize or associate: keeps company with some tough thugs.
See also: company, keep
References in classic literature ?
At those times, I would decide conclusively that my disaffection to dear old Joe and the forge, was gone, and that I was growing up in a fair way to be partners with Joe and to keep company with Biddy - when all in a moment some confounding remembrance of the Havisham days would fall upon me, like a destructive missile, and scatter my wits again.
If you keep company with fools, in no distant time, you'd start thinking, speaking (and doing) just like them.
The larger focus, however, is on reformers who insisted that the living should keep company with the dying.
brushed haunted and grey, I keep company with the clouds, their gaunt
The Ladbrokes St Leger and Emirates Airline Breeders' Cup hero had usual partner Neil Varley in the plate and, with Sir Michael Stoute taking a short break in Mallorca, he was asked only to keep company with Warringah (Kevin Bradshaw), with a more serious examination likely at the weekend when the trainer returns.
Eric Rowan once said of his work: "Grainger creates a world of the imagination; a world in which ivory towers mingle with hot dogs; where the ideas of Breughel and Schongauer keep company with the tracks of snails and slugs; and in which medieval machines are contrasted with letters to a friend.
They would do worse than keep company with Jonathan Raban's Passage to Juneau.
SVEN Goran Eriksson, we are told, has ditched his flamboyant mistress, Nancy of the red catsuit, foil dresses and wayward hair, to keep company with both an old flame and a woman reputedly younger than his daughter.
Catherine McAuley, Elizabeth Ann Seton, Kateri Tekakwitha, Frances Cabrini, and Katharine Drexel keep company with Josephine Bakhita, Thea Bowman, Dorothy Day, and Mother Teresa.
He does this by showing how humans relate to animals, as in "Swans," where a woman lights fires around a lake to warm and keep company with swans at night, or in "Two Deer," where he shows how understanding deer leads to understanding each other.