keel

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even keel

1. adjective Calm and stable. I know this is a stressful time, but we need to try keep things as even keel as possible.
2. noun A calm and stable situation. The phrase alludes to a ship's keel, a supporting structure that helps to keep the ship stable in the water (and thus needs to be "even" or level). Whoa, let's all stop yelling and try to get back on an even keel!
See also: even, keel

keel over

To slump or fall over, typically from fainting or death. The phrase is typically used in a humorous way, especially when it refers to someone (hypothetically) dying. It was so hot that I thought I would keel over and pass out if I didn't get some air soon. Grandpa always used to tell us this silly story about the time when his friend ate a sour pickle and keeled over and died right then and there.
See also: keel, over

on an even keel

In a calm and stable condition. Whoa, let's all stop yelling and try to get back on an even keel! I know this is a stressful time, but we need to try keep things on an even keel as much as possible.
See also: even, keel, on

keel over

[for a person] to fall over or fall down in a faint or in death. It was so hot in the room that two people just keeled over.
See also: keel, over

keel something over

Rur. to push something over. He leaned on the flimsy wall and keeled it right over. The high wind keeled over that sorry old fence.
See also: keel, over

keep on an even keel

Fig. to remain cool and calm. (Originally nautical.) If Jane can keep on an even keel and not panic, she will be all right. Try to keep on an even keel and not get upset so easily.
See also: even, keel, keep, on

keep something on an even keel

Fig. to keep something in a steady and untroubled state. The manager cannot keep the firm on an even keel any longer. When the workers are unhappy, it is difficult to keep the factory on an even keel.
See also: even, keel, keep, on

keel over

Collapse, as if in a faint; also, faint. For example, When she heard the awful news, she keeled over. This term alludes to a vessel rolling on its keel and capsizing. [Mid-1800s]
See also: keel, over

on an even keel

Stable, balanced, as in She had the knack of keeping us on an even keel in any emergency. This term, used figuratively since the mid-1800s, alludes to keeping a vessel's keel in a level position, assuring smooth sailing.
See also: even, keel, on

on an even keel

COMMON If someone or something is on an even keel, they are calm and not changing much, especially during a period of difficulties. She sees it as her role to keep the family on an even keel through its time of hardship. You may begin to wonder if having a baby was the right thing to do and whether you'll ever get back on an even keel. Note: The image here is of a ship moving along smoothly and steadily, because it is balanced and not leaning to either side.
See also: even, keel, on

on an even keel

1 (of a ship or aircraft) not tilting to one side. 2 (of a person or situation) functioning normally after a period of difficulty.
2 1991 Deirdre Purcell A Place of Stones Life ran on an even keel in the house as both of them came and went and became re-immersed in their own lives.
See also: even, keel, on

on an even ˈkeel

living, working or happening in a calm way, with no sudden changes, especially after a difficult time: After all the troubles of the past weeks, life seems to be getting back on an even keel again.
The keel is the long piece of wood or steel along the bottom of a ship, on which the frame is built, and which helps to keep it in a vertical position in the water.
See also: even, keel, on

keel over

v.
1. To fall over; capsize: The ship keeled over when it hit the iceberg.
2. To collapse or fall into or as if into a faint: I keeled over when I heard the bad news.
See also: keel, over

on an even keel

In a stable or unimpaired state: "There was good reason to keep relations with Washington on an even keel" (Helen Kitchen).
See also: even, keel, on
References in periodicals archive ?
This equation stuck with him and four years ago he had the idea of building a lightweight 40-footer, with rudder and forward canard in place to allow the release of the keel from the viscous drag.
The original idea was for an immensely strong rotating carbon "0" ring, located in the centre of the boat, with the keel attached and operated by three small internal cog motors, plus manual deck winches and pulleys.
The Reichel/Pugh design has a 200mm "divot" inset mid-ships to take the keel system, a track secured to the hull with a carriage attached to the keel-head, which moves around the "U" shape of the hull from the vertical, to about 300mm above the waterline on the port or starboard side.
As the keel rotates around the hull, the topside's panel covering the "slot" slides with it.
Outside there are two small holes high in the slot panel, where freshwater hoses plug in back at the dock to flush out the keel systems.
The owner wanted this project to be light, with a furling main and jib, carbon keel and very simple hardware.
The forming of the keel is similar to a copy milling operation.
When engaged, the keel cants as much as 25 degrees to the windward side so that if the boat heels 20 degrees, the keel is actually canted over 45 degrees, he said.
Keel canting is performed by a 5-inch-diameter hydraulic piston that generates up to 35,000 pounds of force to move the 10-foot-long keel.
Chance added that a canting winged keel would be relatively simple to build and install in less elaborate sailboats of 24 feet or longer.
Working together with the canting keel to keep Procyon level is a water-ballast system, an adjustable balance system that uses up to 2 tons of water carried in several tanks on either side of the hull.
To fix the hog, Old Ironsides was settled in the bottom of the drydock on 31 concrete keel blocks, each topped with a metal frame filled with sand.
He reaches up to knock on the original keel of the ship, a white-oak timber that has steered the vessel through 42 victories at sea.
With hull planks removed, the frigate's famous live-oak framing is visible; out of the water, you can actually see the original four-piece white-oak keel, laid in 1794 in the Edmund Hartt Shipyard in Boston's North End neighborhood.
Old Ironsides' 160-foot keel is fashioned from four white-oak timbers.