jury


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the jury is (still) out

A decision has not yet been made. A: "Are we proceeding with the ad campaign?" B: "The jury is out on that. We want to bring in a few more focus groups."
See also: jury, out

jury is still out (on someone or something)

Fig. a decision has not been reached on someone or something; the people making the decision on someone or something have not yet decided. The jury is still out on Jane. We don't know what we are going to do about her. The jury is still out on the question of building a new parking lot.
See also: jury, out, still

jury is still out, the

No decision has been made; the public's opinion is not known. For example, As for a possible merger, the jury is still out, or The jury is still out on the new spring fashions. This expression alludes to the jury that decides a legal case. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: jury, still

the jury is out

or

the jury is still out

COMMON If you say that the jury is out or the jury is still out on a particular subject, you mean that people have not yet formed an opinion about it or reached a decision. The jury's still out on what are the long-term effects of air pollution. Specialists haven't been able to make up their minds whether hair dye is safe or not. `The jury is still out,' says Dr Venitt firmly. Note: This refers to the time when the jury in a court case retires from the court room to decide on a verdict.
See also: jury, out

the jury is out

a decision has not yet been reached on a controversial subject.
1998 New Scientist The jury is still out, but it looks as if there are no significant changes in the cosmic dust flux during past climate cycles.
See also: jury, out

the jury is/are (still) ˈout (on something)

people have not yet decided if something is good or bad: No one knows whether the government’s housing policy is popular or not. The jury is still out on that until the next election.Was he a good leader? The jury is still out on that question.
The jury is a group of members of the public who listen to the facts of a case in a court of law and decide whether or not a person is guilty of a crime. They leave the courtroom to discuss the case and make their decision in secret.
See also: jury, out
References in classic literature ?
Serjeant Buzfuz rubbed his eyes very hard with a large white handkerchief, and gave an appealing look towards the jury, while the judge was visibly affected, and several of the beholders tried to cough down their emotion.
Cluppins, after a careful survey of Master Bardell's buttons and the button-holes to which they severally belonged, placed him on the floor of the court in front of his mother--a commanding position in which he could not fail to awaken the full commiseration and sympathy of both judge and jury. This was not done without considerable opposition, and many tears, on the part of the young gentleman himself, who had certain inward misgivings that the placing him within the full glare of the judge's eye was only a formal prelude to his being immediately ordered away for instant execution, or for transportation beyond the seas, during the whole term of his natural life, at the very least.
"Transportation for life" was the sentence it gave, "And *then* to be fined forty pound." The Jury all cheered, though the Judge said he feared That the phrase was not legally sound.
And now, the jury turned to consider, and the great flies swarmed again.
Stryver, massing his papers before him, whispered with those who sat near, and from time to time glanced anxiously at the jury; while all the spectators moved more or less, and grouped themselves anew; while even my Lord himself arose from his seat, and slowly paced up and down his platform, not unattended by a suspicion in the minds of the audience that his state was feverish; this one man sat leaning back, with his torn gown half off him, his untidy wig put on just as it had happened to fight on his head after its removal, his hands in his pockets, and his eyes on the ceiling as they had been all day.
“Gentlemen of the jury,” he said, “you have heard the testimony, and I shall detain you but a moment.
The tone of Marmaduke was mild and insinuating, and, as his sentiments were given with such apparent impartiality, they did not fail of carrying due weight with the jury. The grave-looking yeomen who composed this tribunal laid their heads together for a few minutes, without leaving the box, when the foreman arose, and, after the forms of the court were duly observed, he pronounced the prisoner to be “Not guilty.”
`But what did the Dormouse say?' one of the jury asked.
While I turn my back now, I beg that several persons will be so good as to pass their fingers through their hair, and then press them upon one of the panes of the window near the jury, and that among them the accused may set THEIR finger marks.
Court, jury, sheriff, and everybody had been too absorbed in observing Wilson's performance to attend to the audience earlier.
My first wife died poisoned; and the verdict of the jury has not absolutely acquitted me of the guilt of causing her death.
'Really Mr Garland,' says Mr Brass's gentleman, 'for a person who has arrived at your time of life, you are, to say the least of it, singularly indiscreet, I think.' The jury think so too, and find Kit guilty.
Bar, who felt that he had got all the rest of the jury and must now lay hold of the Foreman, soon came sidling up, double eye-glass in hand.
One of the jury wanted to know if the same objection applied to coffee.
'And I only wish we'd a jury of the independent sort, in the house for a week or two,' said the beadle; 'the rules and regulations of the board would soon bring their spirit down for